Taming web services from the wild

M. Brian Blake, Michael F. Nowlan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Service-oriented computing is about building new cross-organizational applications by combining, composing, consuming, or interconnecting existing services. So, why do most composite Web service-based systems currently rely on pre-established relationships that aren't created by automated, dynamic discovery and integration? One perceived reason is the inconsistency in service-based interface descriptions and message names. Here, the authors investigate whether human nature - specifically, software developers' tendencies to name service descriptions in significantly consistent ways - can provide syntactical methods for service discovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-69
Number of pages8
JournalIEEE Internet Computing
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 26 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Composite materials

Keywords

  • Business
  • Data mining
  • Distance measurement
  • Internet
  • Service discovery
  • Service-oriented computing
  • Silicon
  • Software
  • Syntactical analysis
  • Web services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Taming web services from the wild. / Blake, M. Brian; Nowlan, Michael F.

In: IEEE Internet Computing, Vol. 12, No. 5, 26.09.2008, p. 62-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blake, MB & Nowlan, MF 2008, 'Taming web services from the wild', IEEE Internet Computing, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 62-69. https://doi.org/10.1109/MIC.2008.112
Blake, M. Brian ; Nowlan, Michael F. / Taming web services from the wild. In: IEEE Internet Computing. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 62-69.
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