Tailored Information and Automated Reminding to Improve Medication Adherence in Spanish- and English-Speaking Elders Treated for Memory Impairment

Raymond L. Ownby, Christopher Hertzog, Sara J. Czaja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Medication adherence is recognized as an issue of critical importance within health care, as many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This study evaluated two interventions targeted at improving adherence in elderly patients being treated for memory impairments. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to control (n = 11), automated reminding (n = 8), or tailored information conditions (n = 8). Medication adherence was evaluated with an electronic pill bottle. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models assessed the effects of the interventions on electronically monitored medication adherence after controlling for covariates. Results showed that individuals in both intervention groups had higher levels of medication adherence than those in the control group. The presence of a caregiver was associated with substantially higher levels of adherence. Verbal memory, but not general cognitive status, predicted better adherence. Mood, health literacy, and executive functions were not associated with adherence. Results thus suggest that both automated reminding and tailored information interventions may improve medication adherence in elders, even among those with memory impairments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-238
Number of pages18
JournalClinical Gerontologist
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Keywords

  • adherence
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cognition
  • memory disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)

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