Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates

Tiffany M Field, S. M. Schanberg, F. Scafidi, Charles R Bauer, N. Vega-Lahr, R. Garcia, J. Nystrom, C. M. Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation was given to 20 preterm neonates (mean gestational age, 31 weeks; mean birth weight, 1,280 g; mean time in neonatal intensive care unit, 20 days) during transitional ('grower') nursery care, and their growth, sleep-wake behavior, and Brazelton scale performance was compared with a group of 20 control neonates. The tactile/kinesthetic stimulation consisted of body stroking and passive movements of the limbs for three, 15-minute periods per day for 10 days. The stimulated neonates averaged a 47% greater weight gain per day (mean 25 g v 17 g), were more active and alert during sleep/wake behavior observations, and showed more mature habituation, orientation, motor, and range of state behavior on the Brazelton scale than control infants. Finally, their hospital stay was 6 days shorter, yielding a cost savings of approximately $3,000 per infant. These data suggest that tactile/kinesthetic stimulation may be a cost effective way of facilitating growth and behavioral organization even in very small preterm neonates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)654-658
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume77
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jul 16 1986

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Touch
Newborn Infant
Sleep
Nurseries
Cost Savings
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Growth
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Weight Gain
Length of Stay
Extremities
Organizations
Costs and Cost Analysis
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Field, T. M., Schanberg, S. M., Scafidi, F., Bauer, C. R., Vega-Lahr, N., Garcia, R., ... Kuhn, C. M. (1986). Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates. Pediatrics, 77(5), 654-658.

Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates. / Field, Tiffany M; Schanberg, S. M.; Scafidi, F.; Bauer, Charles R; Vega-Lahr, N.; Garcia, R.; Nystrom, J.; Kuhn, C. M.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 77, No. 5, 16.07.1986, p. 654-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, TM, Schanberg, SM, Scafidi, F, Bauer, CR, Vega-Lahr, N, Garcia, R, Nystrom, J & Kuhn, CM 1986, 'Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates', Pediatrics, vol. 77, no. 5, pp. 654-658.
Field TM, Schanberg SM, Scafidi F, Bauer CR, Vega-Lahr N, Garcia R et al. Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates. Pediatrics. 1986 Jul 16;77(5):654-658.
Field, Tiffany M ; Schanberg, S. M. ; Scafidi, F. ; Bauer, Charles R ; Vega-Lahr, N. ; Garcia, R. ; Nystrom, J. ; Kuhn, C. M. / Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates. In: Pediatrics. 1986 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 654-658.
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AU - Nystrom, J.

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