Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling

Diego B. Sadler, Gerard P. Aurigemma, David W. Williams, Domenic J. Reda, Barry J Materson, John S. Gottdiener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypertensive patients with concentric remodeling (relative well thickness ≤0.45 and normal left ventricular [LV] mass index) may have poor outcomes. It is unclear whether systolic function abnormalities, shown to be present in some patients with concentric LV hypertrophy (increased LV mass index and relative wall thickness ≤0.45), are also present in patients with concentric remodeling. To assess LV pump, chamber, and myocardial function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling, clinical and echocardiographic data of 118 hypertensive men with concentric remodeling were compared with data from 104 hypertensive men with normal relative wall thickness and normal LV mass index. Chamber function was assessed by relating endocardial fractional shortening to end-systolic circumferential stress, myocardial function was assessed by relating midwall fractional shortening to circumferential stress, and pump performance was assessed by stroke volume (Teichholz method). Compared with hypertensive men with normal relative wall thickness, concentric-remodeling patients had lower stroke volume (84±20 versus 111±20 mL, P<.001). Endocardial shortening was no different between the two groups (38±7% versus 40±7%, P=NS), but midwall shortening was lower in patients with concentric remodeling (20±3% versus 22±3%, P<.001), despite lower end-systolic stress (81±25 versus 117±37 g/cm2. P<.001). Endocardial and midwall stress-shortening regression plots classified 28% and 42%, respectively, of the concentric remodeling patients below the fifth percentile of hypertensive patients with normal geometry. These data indicate that indexes of chamber and myocardial function are lower than those observed in hypertensive patients with normal geometry. Thus, indices of chamber, myocardial, and pump performance indicate potential abnormalities in systolic function in men with concentric remodeling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-781
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension
Volume30
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke Volume
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

Keywords

  • Hypertrophy
  • Left ventricular mass
  • Systolic function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Sadler, D. B., Aurigemma, G. P., Williams, D. W., Reda, D. J., Materson, B. J., & Gottdiener, J. S. (1997). Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling. Hypertension, 30(4), 777-781.

Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling. / Sadler, Diego B.; Aurigemma, Gerard P.; Williams, David W.; Reda, Domenic J.; Materson, Barry J; Gottdiener, John S.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.10.1997, p. 777-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sadler, DB, Aurigemma, GP, Williams, DW, Reda, DJ, Materson, BJ & Gottdiener, JS 1997, 'Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling', Hypertension, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 777-781.
Sadler DB, Aurigemma GP, Williams DW, Reda DJ, Materson BJ, Gottdiener JS. Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling. Hypertension. 1997 Oct 1;30(4):777-781.
Sadler, Diego B. ; Aurigemma, Gerard P. ; Williams, David W. ; Reda, Domenic J. ; Materson, Barry J ; Gottdiener, John S. / Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling. In: Hypertension. 1997 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 777-781.
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