Systemic lupus erythematosus pancreatitis: An uncommon presentation of a common disease

Eduardo A. Rodriguez, Daniel A Sussman, Vanessa R. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis.

Background: Acute pancreatitis is uncommon in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When recognized early and properly treated with IV steroids and hydration, the course may be benign, as exemplified in the following report.

Case Report: A 21-year-old woman with history of SLE and stage IV lupus nephritis, was admitted to the Sergio Bernales Hospital ICU (Lima, Peru), complaining of worsening epigastric pain radiating to the back, and nausea and vomiting for 1 week. She denied prior cholelithiasis, alcohol use, or recent medication changes. On examination, she was tachycardic and normotensive, with a slightly distended abdomen and epigastric tenderness on deep palpation, without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory results demonstrated leukocytosis without left shift, creatinine of 2.26 mg/dL, amylase of 750 U/L, and lipase of 1038 U/L. Liver chemistries, calcium, lactic acid, triglycerides, and IgG4 were normal and alcohol level was undetectable. Ultrasound did not show cholelithiasis, biliary sludge, or common bile duct dilation. CT of the abdomen showed pancreas head (parenchyma) stranding with uniform enhancement consistent with interstitial pancreatitis. Despite receiving IV fluids, opiates, anti-emetics, and nothing by mouth, her clinical condition deteriorated, prompting the use of IV methylprednisolone. After completing 1 week of IV steroids, she was transferred to the medical floor clinically improved. The patient was discharged with an oral steroid taper and complete resolution of symptoms.

Conclusions: After ruling out common causes, such as hepatobiliary pathology or toxin-related insults like alcohol, hypercalcemia, hypertriglyceridemia or medications, steroids may be used in SLE pancreatitis because they might improve the overall prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-503
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Case Reports
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2014

Fingerprint

Pancreatitis
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Steroids
Cholelithiasis
Alcohols
Abdomen
Opiate Alkaloids
Lupus Nephritis
Peru
Antiemetics
Palpation
Hypertriglyceridemia
Leukocytosis
Methylprednisolone
Common Bile Duct
Hypercalcemia
Amylases
Lipase
Bile
Nausea

Keywords

  • Lupus Erythematosus
  • Pancreas
  • Pancreatitis
  • Systemic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Systemic lupus erythematosus pancreatitis : An uncommon presentation of a common disease. / Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Sussman, Daniel A; Rodriguez, Vanessa R.

In: American Journal of Case Reports, Vol. 15, 17.11.2014, p. 501-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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