Switch from protease inhibitor- to efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy improves quality of life, treatment satisfaction and adherence with low rates of virological failure in virologically suppressed patients

R. E. Campo, C. Cohen, K. Grimm, T. Shangguan, J. Maa, D. Seekins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Regimen selection in antiretroviral therapy can impact treatment adherence, quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction, and may influence clinical outcome. We evaluated the effect of regimen switching on virological, safety and patientreported outcomes. In this 48-week, open-label, randomized, non-inferiority study, 262 HIV-1-infected adult patients with a viral load <50 copies/mL on protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimens were switched to either once-daily efavirenz, lamivudine and entericcoated didanosine (efavirenz-A [QD]) or once-daily efavirenz plus continuation of current nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (efavirenz-B). In the primary outcome of patients who maintained virological suppression at week 48, efavirenz-A (QD) was non-inferior to efavirenz-B (81% versus 79%, respectively). Both regimens were associated with low virological failure rates and significant improvements in treatment satisfaction, adherence and QoL after switching from PI-based therapy, with no differences between regimens. Switching from a PI- to an efavirenz-based regimen was generally safe and well tolerated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-171
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Efavirenz
  • HIV
  • Once-daily dosing
  • Quality of life
  • Regimen switch
  • Treatment satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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