Survival of Alzheimer's disease patients with regard to pattern of care in South Carolina, 1988-1993.

Y. Huang, C. A. Macera, C. B. Cornman, D. R. Davis, W. K. Scott, L. Neff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The length of time from diagnosis of AD to death was compared among three groups of AD patients in South Carolina. Each group received a different pattern of care. The survival time from diagnosis to death was longest among those who lived in institutions (mean three years for men, 4.6 years for women), and shortest among those who lived alone in the community (1.7 years for men, two years for women). The longer survival time of those who receive care (either in the community or in facilities) suggests that persons with AD benefit from personal attention to health needs. Providing additional support to family members of those with AD could help patients remain in the community longer, thus maintaining quality of life. For those who have no support in the community, efforts should be made to increase access to facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the South Carolina Medical Association (1975)
Volume90
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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