Survival disparities in newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a national perspective

Juan E Sola, Steven N. Bronson, Michael C. Cheung, Beatriz Ordonez, Holly Neville, Leonidas G. Koniaris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine national outcomes for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Methods: We analyzed the Kids' Inpatient Database for patients admitted at less than 8 days of age. Results: Overall, 2774 hospitalizations were identified. Most patients were white and had private insurance. Most patients were treated at urban (96%), teaching (75%), and not identified as children's hospital (NIACH) (50%). Birth was the most common admission source at NIACH (91%) and children's unit in general hospital (CUGH) (59%), compared to hospital transfer at children's general hospital (CGH) (81%). Most CDH were repaired through the abdomen (81%), and 25% required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Most NIACH patients were transferred to another hospital, whereas most at CGH and CUGH were discharged home. Survival to discharge was 66% after excluding hospital transfers. Univariate analysis revealed higher survival for males, birth weight (BW) of 3 kg or more, whites, patients with private insurance, and those in the highest median household income quartile. Survival was 86% after CDH repair but 46% for ECMO. Multivariate analysis identified black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.536; P = .03) and other race (HR, 1.515; P = .03) as independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: Hospital survival for CDH is related to sex, BW, race, and socioeconomic status. Blacks and other non-Hispanic minorities have higher mortality rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1336-1342
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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Newborn Infant
Survival
General Hospitals
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Insurance
Birth Weight
Hospital Units
Mortality
Herniorrhaphy
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias
Social Class
Abdomen
Inpatients
Teaching
Hospitalization
Multivariate Analysis
Parturition
Databases

Keywords

  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia
  • KID
  • Outcomes
  • Population-based study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Survival disparities in newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia : a national perspective. / Sola, Juan E; Bronson, Steven N.; Cheung, Michael C.; Ordonez, Beatriz; Neville, Holly; Koniaris, Leonidas G.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 45, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 1336-1342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sola, Juan E ; Bronson, Steven N. ; Cheung, Michael C. ; Ordonez, Beatriz ; Neville, Holly ; Koniaris, Leonidas G. / Survival disparities in newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia : a national perspective. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 45, No. 6. pp. 1336-1342.
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