SURVEILLANCE AND MONITORING OF A BUS SYSTEM.

Ira M Sheskin, Peter R. Stopher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most transit operators occasionally conduct an on-board survey of riders. Based on experiences in Washtenaw County (Ann Arbor) Michigan, Dade County (Miami) Florida, and Honolulu, Hawaii, this paper examines three aspects of such surveys. First, a survey instrument is described that permits considerably more information to be collected than is possible from the traditional postcard type of on-board survey. Descriptions of the types of data needed to be collected on the participatory self-administered survey of riders for both systemwide surveillance and individual route monitoring are provided. Second, procedures are described for reducing nonresponse bias for collecting at least some information from a subgroup of riders who would otherwise be nonrespondents. Third, sampling strategies (including the necessary sample sizes) are described both for systemwide surveillance and individual route monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalTransportation Research Record
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Monitoring
Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

SURVEILLANCE AND MONITORING OF A BUS SYSTEM. / Sheskin, Ira M; Stopher, Peter R.

In: Transportation Research Record, 1982, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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