Support for indoor bans on electronic cigarettes among current and former smokers

Stephanie K. Kolar, Brooke G. Rogers, Monica W Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing in the U.S. Although marketed as a safer alternative for cigarettes, initial evidence suggests that e-cigarettes may pose a secondhand exposure risk. The current study explored the prevalence and correlates of support for e-cigarette bans. Methods: A sample of 265 current/former smokers completed a cross-sectional telephone survey from June-September 2014; 45% Black, 31% White, 21% Hispanic. Items assessed support for home and workplace bans for cigarettes and e-cigarettes and associated risk perceptions. Results: Most participants were aware of e-cigarettes (99%). Results demonstrated less support for complete e-cigarette bans in homes and workplaces compared to cigarettes. Support for complete e-cigarette bans was strongest among older, higher income, married respondents, and former smokers. Complete e-cigarette bans were most strongly endorsed when perceptions of addictiveness and health risks were high. While both e-cigarette lifetime and never-users strongly supported cigarette smoking bans, endorsement for e-cigarette bans varied by lifetime use and intentions to use e-cigarettes. Conclusions: Support for indoor e-cigarette bans is relatively low among individuals with a smoking history. Support for e-cigarette bans may change as evidence regarding their use emerges. These findings have implications for public health policy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12174-12189
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 25 2014

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
Workplace
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Electronic Cigarettes
Public Policy
Health Policy
Hispanic Americans
Telephone
Public Health
History
Health

Keywords

  • E-cigarette
  • Electronic cigarette
  • Environmental smoke
  • Nicotine
  • Secondhand vapor
  • Vaping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Support for indoor bans on electronic cigarettes among current and former smokers. / Kolar, Stephanie K.; Rogers, Brooke G.; Hooper, Monica W.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 11, No. 12, 25.11.2014, p. 12174-12189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolar, Stephanie K. ; Rogers, Brooke G. ; Hooper, Monica W. / Support for indoor bans on electronic cigarettes among current and former smokers. In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 12. pp. 12174-12189.
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