Subduction of south pacific tropical water and its equatorward pathways as shown by a simulated passive tracer

Tangdong Qu, Shan Gao, Rana A Fine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the subduction of South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) and its equatorward pathways using a simulated passive tracer of the consortium Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO). The results show that approximately 5.8 Sv (1 Sv [ 106m3 s-1) of the SPTW is formed in the subtropical South Pacific Ocean within the density range between 24.0 and 25.0 kgm-3, of which about 87% is due to vertical pumping and 13% is due to lateral induction, comparing reasonably well with estimates from climatological data. Once subducted, most SPTW spreads in the subtropical South Pacific. Because of the presence of mixing, some portion of the water is transformed, and its tracer-weighted density steadily increases from an initial value of 24.4 to nearly 25.0 kgm-3 after 13 years of integration. Approximately 42% of the water makes its way into the equatorial Pacific, either through the western boundary or interior pathway. The two equatorward pathways are essentially of equal importance. A large (~70%) portion of the SPTW entering the equatorial region resurfaces in the central equatorial Pacific. The potential impacts of the resurfacing SPTW on the equatorial thermocline and surface stratification are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1551-1565
Number of pages15
JournalJ. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY
Volume43
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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subduction
tracer
water
thermocline
pumping
stratification
climate
ocean

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography

Cite this

Subduction of south pacific tropical water and its equatorward pathways as shown by a simulated passive tracer. / Qu, Tangdong; Gao, Shan; Fine, Rana A.

In: J. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY, Vol. 43, No. 8, 2013, p. 1551-1565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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