Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage: Natural history, prognosis, and precursive factors in the Framingham Study

Ralph L. Sacco, Philip A. Wolf, Nadir E. Bharucha, Stephen L. Meeks, William B. Kannel, L. Joseph Charette, Patricia M. McNamara, E. Prather Palmer, Ralph D’Agostino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

323 Scopus citations

Abstract

No uniformly accepted hypothesis explains the genesis and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. We followed 5,184 men and women prospectively for 26 years; 36 cases of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) accounted for 62% of all intracranial hemorrhages. Blood pressure before SAH was higher in these patients than in controls. Definite hypertension (≥ 160 mm Hg and/or ≥ 95 mm Hg) at entry to the study or at closest exam before SAH was more frequent than in controls. Cigarette smoking, particularly heavy smoking, was also more frequent among cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-854
Number of pages8
JournalNeurology
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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    Sacco, R. L., Wolf, P. A., Bharucha, N. E., Meeks, S. L., Kannel, W. B., Charette, L. J., McNamara, P. M., Palmer, E. P., & D’Agostino, R. (1984). Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage: Natural history, prognosis, and precursive factors in the Framingham Study. Neurology, 34(7), 847-854. https://doi.org/10.1212/wnl.34.7.847