Structural Ecosystems Therapy for Recovering HIV-Positive Women: Child, Mother, and Parenting Outcomes

Victoria Mitrani, Brian McCabe, Carleen Robinson, Nomi S. Weiss-Laxer, Daniel J Feaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study presents results of a subgroup analysis from a randomized trial to examine whether Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention intended to improve medication adherence and reduce drug relapse of HIV-seropositive (HIV+) women recovering from drug abuse, provided benefits for families with children. Data from 42 children and 25 mothers were analyzed at baseline, and 4, 8, and 12 months post-baseline. Results of longitudinal Generalized Estimating Equations analyses suggested that SET was more efficacious than the Health Group (HG) control condition in decreasing children's internalizing and externalizing problems and reducing mothers' psychological distress and drug relapse. Children in SET reported improvements in positive parenting as compared to the children in HG, but there were no differences in mother-reported positive parenting, or parental involvement as reported by either the children or mothers. These findings suggest that family interventions such as SET may be beneficial for mothers and children. An adaptation of SET specifically for families with children could further enhance benefits and improve acceptability and cost-effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)746-755
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Parenting
Ecosystem
Mothers
HIV
Family Therapy
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Medication Adherence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Substance-Related Disorders
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Psychology
Control Groups
Health

Keywords

  • Children's externalizing and internalizing problems
  • Maternal drug abuse
  • Maternal HIV
  • Structural Ecosystems Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Structural Ecosystems Therapy for Recovering HIV-Positive Women : Child, Mother, and Parenting Outcomes. / Mitrani, Victoria; McCabe, Brian; Robinson, Carleen; Weiss-Laxer, Nomi S.; Feaster, Daniel J.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.12.2010, p. 746-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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