Stroke training of prehospital providers

An example of simulation-enhanced blended learning and evaluation

David Lee Gordon, Barry Issenberg, Michael S. Gordon, David Lacombe, William C. McGaghie, Emil R. Petrusa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since appropriate treatment of patients in the first few hours of ischemic stroke may decrease the risk of long-term disability, prehospital providers should recognize, assess, manage and communicate about stroke patients in an effective and time-efficient manner. This requires the instruction and evaluation of a wide range of competencies including clinical skills, patient investigation and management and communication skills. The authors developed and assessed the effectiveness of a simulation-enhanced stroke course that incorporates several different learning strategies to evaluate competencies in the care of acute stroke patients. The one-day, interactive, emergency stroke course features a simulation-enhanced, blended-learning approach that includes didactic lectures, tabletop exercises, and focused-examination training and small-group sessions led by paramedic instructors as standardized patients portraying five key neurological syndromes. From January to October 2000, 345 learners were assessed using multiple-choice tests as were randomly selected group of 73 learners using skills' checklists during two pre- and two post-course simulated patient encounters. Among all learners there was a significant gain in knowledge (pre: 53.9% ± 13.9 and post: 85.4% ± 8.5; p < 0.001), and for the 73 learners a significant improvement in their clinical and communication skills (p < 0.0001 for all). By using a simulation-enhanced, blended-learning approach, pre-hospital paraprofessionals were successfully trained and evaluated in a wide range of competences that will lead to the more improved recognition and management of acute stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-121
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

Fingerprint

Blended Learning
stroke
Stroke
Learning
simulation
evaluation
Clinical Competence
communication skills
Communication
Allied Health Personnel
learning strategy
management
didactics
small group
Checklist
instructor
Mental Competency
Emergencies
instruction
examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Stroke training of prehospital providers : An example of simulation-enhanced blended learning and evaluation. / Gordon, David Lee; Issenberg, Barry; Gordon, Michael S.; Lacombe, David; McGaghie, William C.; Petrusa, Emil R.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.03.2005, p. 114-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gordon, David Lee ; Issenberg, Barry ; Gordon, Michael S. ; Lacombe, David ; McGaghie, William C. ; Petrusa, Emil R. / Stroke training of prehospital providers : An example of simulation-enhanced blended learning and evaluation. In: Medical Teacher. 2005 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 114-121.
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