Stroke in heart failure in sinus rhythm

The warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction trial

Patrick M. Pullicino, John L P Thompson, Ralph L Sacco, Alexandra R. Sanford, Min Qian, John R. Teerlink, Haissam Haddad, Monika Diek, Ronald S. Freudenberger, Arthur J. Labovitz, Marco R. Di Tullio, Dirk J. Lok, Piotr Ponikowski, Stefan D. Anker, Susan Graham, Douglas L. Mann, J. P. Mohr, Shunichi Homma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial found no difference between warfarin and aspirin in patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm for the primary outcome: first to occur of 84 incident ischemic strokes (IIS), 7 intracerebral hemorrhages or 531 deaths. Prespecified secondary analysis showed a 48% hazard ratio reduction (p = 0.005) for warfarin in IIS. Cardioembolism is likely the main pathogenesis of stroke in heart failure. We examined the IIS benefit for warfarin in more detail in post hoc secondary analyses. Methods: We subtyped IIS into definite, possible and noncardioembolic using the Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation method. Statistical tests, stratified by prior ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, were the conditional binomial for independent Poisson variables for rates, the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test for stroke subtype and the van Elteren test for modified Rankin Score (mRS) and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) distributions, and an exact test for proportions. Results: Twenty-nine of 1,142 warfarin and 55 of 1,163 aspirin patients had IIS. The warfarin IIS rate (0.727/100 patient-years, PY) was lower than for aspirin (1.36/100 PY, p = 0.003). Definite cardioembolic IIS was less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.22 vs. 0.55/100 PY, p = 0.012). Possible cardioembolic IIS tended to be less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.37 vs. 0.67/100 PY, p = 0.063) but noncardioembolic IIS showed no difference: 5 (0.12/100 PY) versus 6 (0.15/100 PY, p = 0.768). Among patients experiencing IIS, there were no differences by treatment arm in fatal IIS, baseline mRS, mRS 90 days after IIS, and change from baseline to post-IIS mRS. The warfarin arm showed a trend to a lower proportion of severe nonfatal IIS [mRS 3-5; 3/23 (13.0%) vs. 16/48 (33.3%), p = 0.086]. There was no difference in NIHSS at the time of stroke (p = 0.825) or in post-IIS mRS (p = 0.948) between cardioembolic, possible cardioembolic and noncardioembolic stroke including both warfarin and aspirin groups. Conclusions: The observed benefits in the reduction of IIS for warfarin compared to aspirin are most significant for cardioembolic IIS among patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm. This is supported by trends to lower frequencies of severe IIS and possible cardioembolic IIS in patients on warfarin compared to aspirin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-78
Number of pages5
JournalCerebrovascular Diseases
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Warfarin
Aspirin
Heart Failure
Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Cardiac embolism
  • Heart failure
  • Stroke prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Stroke in heart failure in sinus rhythm : The warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction trial. / Pullicino, Patrick M.; Thompson, John L P; Sacco, Ralph L; Sanford, Alexandra R.; Qian, Min; Teerlink, John R.; Haddad, Haissam; Diek, Monika; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.; Graham, Susan; Mann, Douglas L.; Mohr, J. P.; Homma, Shunichi.

In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.09.2013, p. 74-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pullicino, PM, Thompson, JLP, Sacco, RL, Sanford, AR, Qian, M, Teerlink, JR, Haddad, H, Diek, M, Freudenberger, RS, Labovitz, AJ, Di Tullio, MR, Lok, DJ, Ponikowski, P, Anker, SD, Graham, S, Mann, DL, Mohr, JP & Homma, S 2013, 'Stroke in heart failure in sinus rhythm: The warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction trial', Cerebrovascular Diseases, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 74-78. https://doi.org/10.1159/000352058
Pullicino, Patrick M. ; Thompson, John L P ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Sanford, Alexandra R. ; Qian, Min ; Teerlink, John R. ; Haddad, Haissam ; Diek, Monika ; Freudenberger, Ronald S. ; Labovitz, Arthur J. ; Di Tullio, Marco R. ; Lok, Dirk J. ; Ponikowski, Piotr ; Anker, Stefan D. ; Graham, Susan ; Mann, Douglas L. ; Mohr, J. P. ; Homma, Shunichi. / Stroke in heart failure in sinus rhythm : The warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction trial. In: Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 74-78.
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Stroke in heart failure in sinus rhythm

T2 - The warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction trial

AU - Pullicino, Patrick M.

AU - Thompson, John L P

AU - Sacco, Ralph L

AU - Sanford, Alexandra R.

AU - Qian, Min

AU - Teerlink, John R.

AU - Haddad, Haissam

AU - Diek, Monika

AU - Freudenberger, Ronald S.

AU - Labovitz, Arthur J.

AU - Di Tullio, Marco R.

AU - Lok, Dirk J.

AU - Ponikowski, Piotr

AU - Anker, Stefan D.

AU - Graham, Susan

AU - Mann, Douglas L.

AU - Mohr, J. P.

AU - Homma, Shunichi

PY - 2013/9/1

Y1 - 2013/9/1

N2 - Background: The Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial found no difference between warfarin and aspirin in patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm for the primary outcome: first to occur of 84 incident ischemic strokes (IIS), 7 intracerebral hemorrhages or 531 deaths. Prespecified secondary analysis showed a 48% hazard ratio reduction (p = 0.005) for warfarin in IIS. Cardioembolism is likely the main pathogenesis of stroke in heart failure. We examined the IIS benefit for warfarin in more detail in post hoc secondary analyses. Methods: We subtyped IIS into definite, possible and noncardioembolic using the Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation method. Statistical tests, stratified by prior ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, were the conditional binomial for independent Poisson variables for rates, the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test for stroke subtype and the van Elteren test for modified Rankin Score (mRS) and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) distributions, and an exact test for proportions. Results: Twenty-nine of 1,142 warfarin and 55 of 1,163 aspirin patients had IIS. The warfarin IIS rate (0.727/100 patient-years, PY) was lower than for aspirin (1.36/100 PY, p = 0.003). Definite cardioembolic IIS was less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.22 vs. 0.55/100 PY, p = 0.012). Possible cardioembolic IIS tended to be less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.37 vs. 0.67/100 PY, p = 0.063) but noncardioembolic IIS showed no difference: 5 (0.12/100 PY) versus 6 (0.15/100 PY, p = 0.768). Among patients experiencing IIS, there were no differences by treatment arm in fatal IIS, baseline mRS, mRS 90 days after IIS, and change from baseline to post-IIS mRS. The warfarin arm showed a trend to a lower proportion of severe nonfatal IIS [mRS 3-5; 3/23 (13.0%) vs. 16/48 (33.3%), p = 0.086]. There was no difference in NIHSS at the time of stroke (p = 0.825) or in post-IIS mRS (p = 0.948) between cardioembolic, possible cardioembolic and noncardioembolic stroke including both warfarin and aspirin groups. Conclusions: The observed benefits in the reduction of IIS for warfarin compared to aspirin are most significant for cardioembolic IIS among patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm. This is supported by trends to lower frequencies of severe IIS and possible cardioembolic IIS in patients on warfarin compared to aspirin.

AB - Background: The Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial found no difference between warfarin and aspirin in patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm for the primary outcome: first to occur of 84 incident ischemic strokes (IIS), 7 intracerebral hemorrhages or 531 deaths. Prespecified secondary analysis showed a 48% hazard ratio reduction (p = 0.005) for warfarin in IIS. Cardioembolism is likely the main pathogenesis of stroke in heart failure. We examined the IIS benefit for warfarin in more detail in post hoc secondary analyses. Methods: We subtyped IIS into definite, possible and noncardioembolic using the Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation method. Statistical tests, stratified by prior ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, were the conditional binomial for independent Poisson variables for rates, the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test for stroke subtype and the van Elteren test for modified Rankin Score (mRS) and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) distributions, and an exact test for proportions. Results: Twenty-nine of 1,142 warfarin and 55 of 1,163 aspirin patients had IIS. The warfarin IIS rate (0.727/100 patient-years, PY) was lower than for aspirin (1.36/100 PY, p = 0.003). Definite cardioembolic IIS was less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.22 vs. 0.55/100 PY, p = 0.012). Possible cardioembolic IIS tended to be less frequent on warfarin than aspirin (0.37 vs. 0.67/100 PY, p = 0.063) but noncardioembolic IIS showed no difference: 5 (0.12/100 PY) versus 6 (0.15/100 PY, p = 0.768). Among patients experiencing IIS, there were no differences by treatment arm in fatal IIS, baseline mRS, mRS 90 days after IIS, and change from baseline to post-IIS mRS. The warfarin arm showed a trend to a lower proportion of severe nonfatal IIS [mRS 3-5; 3/23 (13.0%) vs. 16/48 (33.3%), p = 0.086]. There was no difference in NIHSS at the time of stroke (p = 0.825) or in post-IIS mRS (p = 0.948) between cardioembolic, possible cardioembolic and noncardioembolic stroke including both warfarin and aspirin groups. Conclusions: The observed benefits in the reduction of IIS for warfarin compared to aspirin are most significant for cardioembolic IIS among patients with low ejection fraction in sinus rhythm. This is supported by trends to lower frequencies of severe IIS and possible cardioembolic IIS in patients on warfarin compared to aspirin.

KW - Aspirin

KW - Cardiac embolism

KW - Heart failure

KW - Stroke prevention

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