Stress and immunity

Francisco A. Tausk, Ilia Elenkov, Ralf Paus, Steven Richardson, Marcelo Label

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain and the immune system are the two major adaptive systems of the body. There is crosstalk between these two systems, which allows for maintaining homeostasis. here is a large body of evidence that documents the effects of stress on a variety of components of the immune response at the systemic level as well as cutaneous immunity. Stress can render the host more susceptible to bacterial infections and the development of cancer. Emotional stressors have been anecdotally linked to the development or exacerbation of a number of skin diseases (for example, acne, vitiligo, alopecia areata, lichen planus, seborrheic dermatitis, herpes infections). The role of stress in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis is well studied, and has established the adverse effects of stress on the clinical course of both diseases. There is definitely a brain-skin connection that can translate emotional stressors into biochemical mediators that can result in adverse effects on dermatologic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClinical and Basic Immunodermatology
PublisherSpringer London
Pages45-65
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)9781848001640
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunity
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Alopecia Areata
Lichen Planus
Skin
Vitiligo
Acne Vulgaris
Brain
Atopic Dermatitis
Psoriasis
Bacterial Infections
Skin Diseases
Immune System
Homeostasis
Infection
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Tausk, F. A., Elenkov, I., Paus, R., Richardson, S., & Label, M. (2008). Stress and immunity. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology (pp. 45-65). Springer London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-165-7_4

Stress and immunity. / Tausk, Francisco A.; Elenkov, Ilia; Paus, Ralf; Richardson, Steven; Label, Marcelo.

Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology. Springer London, 2008. p. 45-65.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tausk, FA, Elenkov, I, Paus, R, Richardson, S & Label, M 2008, Stress and immunity. in Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology. Springer London, pp. 45-65. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-165-7_4
Tausk FA, Elenkov I, Paus R, Richardson S, Label M. Stress and immunity. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology. Springer London. 2008. p. 45-65 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-165-7_4
Tausk, Francisco A. ; Elenkov, Ilia ; Paus, Ralf ; Richardson, Steven ; Label, Marcelo. / Stress and immunity. Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology. Springer London, 2008. pp. 45-65
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