STD patients’ preferences for HIV prevention strategies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge of and preferences regarding effective biomedical interventions among high risk individuals attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic, and to examine the effect of a brief information intervention on preference. Participants completed a baseline assessment, attended a presentation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention methods, and completed a postintervention assessment. Outcome measures included: demographics and sexual risk factors, self-perceived HIV risk, and knowledge and attitudes regarding new biomedical methods of HIV prevention. After the baseline evaluation, participants were provided with information on new biomedical prevention strategies. Participants were given the option to review the information by reading a pamphlet or by viewing a brief video containing the same information. Participants (n=97) were female (n=51) and male (n=46). At baseline, only a small minority of participants were aware of the newer biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. Postintervention, 40% endorsed having heard about the use of HIV medications to prevent HIV infection; 72% had heard that male circumcision can decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men; and 73% endorsed knowledge of the potential role of microbicides in decreasing the risk of acquiring HIV. Following the intervention, the most preferred prevention method was male condoms, followed by preexposure prophylaxis, and microbicides. The least preferred methods were male circumcision and female condoms. This study provides preliminary information on knowledge and attitudes regarding newer biomedical interventions to protect against HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-175
Number of pages5
JournalHIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Biomedical HIV prevention
  • Male circumcision
  • Microbicides
  • PrEP
  • STD clinic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology
  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology
  • Dermatology

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