State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands: natural vs anthropogenic impacts

P. W. Glynn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged El Nino 1982-1983 sea warming resulted in 95-99% coral mortality, virtually eliminating corals throughout the archipelago. The population size of an ubiquitous, large sea urchin Eucidaris thouarsii was unaffected by the warming event. Urchins later showed increased abundance on dead coral colonies and frameworks, and caused bioerosion that exceeded the net calcification capacity of disturbed reefs. Human impacts on corals result mainly from anchor damage, collection of corals for sale as curios, and mechanical damage resulting from the activities of fishermen. -from Author

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMarine Pollution Bulletin
Pages131-140
Number of pages10
Volume29
Edition1-3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994

Fingerprint

Galapagos Islands
Reefs
Anchors
coral reefs
coral reef
anthropogenic activities
corals
coral
Sales
warming
bioerosion
damage
mechanical damage
calcification
El Nino
fishermen
Echinoidea
anchor
anthropogenic effect
sales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography
  • Pollution

Cite this

Glynn, P. W. (1994). State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands: natural vs anthropogenic impacts. In Marine Pollution Bulletin (1-3 ed., Vol. 29, pp. 131-140)

State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands : natural vs anthropogenic impacts. / Glynn, P. W.

Marine Pollution Bulletin. Vol. 29 1-3. ed. 1994. p. 131-140.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Glynn, PW 1994, State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands: natural vs anthropogenic impacts. in Marine Pollution Bulletin. 1-3 edn, vol. 29, pp. 131-140.
Glynn PW. State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands: natural vs anthropogenic impacts. In Marine Pollution Bulletin. 1-3 ed. Vol. 29. 1994. p. 131-140
Glynn, P. W. / State of coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands : natural vs anthropogenic impacts. Marine Pollution Bulletin. Vol. 29 1-3. ed. 1994. pp. 131-140
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