Stable isotopes as tracers of methane dynamics in Everglades marshes with and without active populations of methane oxidizing bacteria

J. D. Happell, J. P. Chanton, G. J. Whiting, W. J. Showers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous workers have shown that Everglades soil types differ in that CH4 oxidizing bacteria are active in peat soils and inactive in marl soils, however a comparison of the stable isotopic composition of emitted and sedimentary CH4 from Cladium marshes within marl and peat soils provided no evidence that rhizospheric CH4 oxidizing bacteria were consuming significant quantities of CH4 in situ within peat soils. Either CH4 oxidation in the rhizosphere was insignificant due to O2 limitation or it occurred quantitatively in discrete zones within the sediment, thereby imparting no isotopic signal to sedimentary CH4. Linear relationships between CH4 flux and live aboveground Cladium biomass in marl and peat soils were identical and offered no evidence for rhizospheric CH4 oxidation in peat soils. In contrast core incubation experiments indicated that CH4 oxidizing bacteria at the sediment-water interface in peat soils intercepted and oxidized from 41 to 93% of the CH4 diffusing from the sediments toward the overlying flood water. Lowering of the water table below the sediment surface caused an Everglades sawgrass marsh to shift from CH4 emission to the consumption of atmospheric CH4. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14,771-14,782
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume98
Issue numberD8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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