Sport-related-concussions Pilot study: Athletic training students' media use and perceptions of media coverage

Tywan G. Martin, Jessica Wallace, Young Ik Suh, Kysha Harriell, Justin Tatman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine athletic training students' media consumption to advance our understanding of the role the media play in reported incidences of sport-related concussion (SRC) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in American football and how media coverage of those injuries may potentially influence public perception. Participants who consumed more hours of television per day were more likely to disagree with the statements that reporting on SRC has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 11.06, p = .01, and that reporting on CTE has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 8.67, p = .01. Respondents who consumed more hours of Internet per day were more likely to disagree with the statements that accurate terminology is used to report SRC, H(2) = 7.78, p = .02, and that reporting of SRCs has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 8.27, p = .02.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-94
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Communication
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Athletic trainers
  • Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)
  • Consumer behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Business and International Management
  • Communication

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