Splenic cysts

Samuel A. Shabtaie, Anthony Richard Hogan, Mark B. Slidell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Splenic cysts are rare in the United States but more common in regions of the world where Echinococcus is endemic. Cysts are typically classified as true cysts or pseudocysts. True cysts can be parasitic or nonparasitic in origin, whereas most pseudocysts are a result of previous trauma. Recent recognition of features shared by true cysts and pseudocysts suggests the classification system may need to be revised. The prevalence of splenic cysts has increased secondary to the widespread use of abdominal imaging and successful nonoperative management of traumatic splenic injuries. Treatment previously consisted primarily of total splenectomy. However, recognition of the importance of the spleen throughout a patient’s life has led to changes in the management of splenic disease. Advances in the testing and preoperative localization of splenic lesions have also led to increased efforts in splenic conservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e251-e256
JournalPediatric Annals
Volume45
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Cysts
Splenic Diseases
Echinococcus
Wounds and Injuries
Splenectomy
Spleen
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shabtaie, S. A., Hogan, A. R., & Slidell, M. B. (2016). Splenic cysts. Pediatric Annals, 45(7), e251-e256. https://doi.org/10.3928/00904481-20160523-01

Splenic cysts. / Shabtaie, Samuel A.; Hogan, Anthony Richard; Slidell, Mark B.

In: Pediatric Annals, Vol. 45, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. e251-e256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shabtaie, SA, Hogan, AR & Slidell, MB 2016, 'Splenic cysts', Pediatric Annals, vol. 45, no. 7, pp. e251-e256. https://doi.org/10.3928/00904481-20160523-01
Shabtaie SA, Hogan AR, Slidell MB. Splenic cysts. Pediatric Annals. 2016 Jul 1;45(7):e251-e256. https://doi.org/10.3928/00904481-20160523-01
Shabtaie, Samuel A. ; Hogan, Anthony Richard ; Slidell, Mark B. / Splenic cysts. In: Pediatric Annals. 2016 ; Vol. 45, No. 7. pp. e251-e256.
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