Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting

Riley E. Splittstoesser, William S. Marras, Thomas Best

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Objective: Investigate effects of interactions between biomechanical, psychosocial and individual risk factors on spinal loading and inflammatory responses. Background: Current low back pain causation theories do not explain the difficulty making specific diagnoses based on low back imaging. Methods: Two groups of subjects possessing sensor or intuitor personality trait performed repetitive lifting with high or low mental workload. Spinal loading was assessed using a biomechanical model and immune markers were collected before and after lifting. Results: Mental loading was associated with a decrease in AP shear. Both exposure conditions were characterized by a time-regulate immune response evidenced by markers of inflammation, tissue trauma and muscle damage. Intuitors CK levels increased over sensors following the low mental workload condition but not for the high mental workload condition. Conclusions: An immune response exists to lifting and mental loading that is influenced by personality and mental workload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
Pages1034-1038
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 19 2011Sep 23 2011

Other

Other55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period9/19/119/23/11

Fingerprint

workload
personality
Sensors
personality traits
Muscle
trauma
pain
damages
Tissue
Imaging techniques
interaction
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Splittstoesser, R. E., Marras, W. S., & Best, T. (2011). Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 (pp. 1034-1038) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551216

Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting. / Splittstoesser, Riley E.; Marras, William S.; Best, Thomas.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. p. 1034-1038.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Splittstoesser, RE, Marras, WS & Best, T 2011, Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. pp. 1034-1038, 55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011, Las Vegas, NV, United States, 9/19/11. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551216
Splittstoesser RE, Marras WS, Best T. Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. p. 1034-1038 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551216
Splittstoesser, Riley E. ; Marras, William S. ; Best, Thomas. / Spinal loading and immune responses to personality and mental load during repetitive lifting. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. pp. 1034-1038
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