Spinal CSF from rats with painful peripheral neuropathy evokes catecholamine release from chromaffin cells in vitro

Ian Hentall, Jacqueline Sagen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The environment presented by host tissue may influence cellular transplants in the CNS depending on injury or disease. Here we examined whether chronic pain alters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby enhancing the analgesic effect of transplanted adrenal cells. CSF samples were taken intracisternally from rats with neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. The samples were applied to cultured bovine chromaffin-cell clusters while catecholamine release was measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. This caused marked and sustained elevations in catecholamine levels, compared to CSF from sham-operated controls, which were reversible by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. These results suggest that chronic neuropathic pain produces increased CSF levels of secretogogues for chromaffin cells, and illustrates the importance of host microenvironmental factors in determining graft function. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-98
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume286
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2000

Fingerprint

Chromaffin Cells
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Catecholamines
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Neuralgia
Chronic Pain
Nicotinic Antagonists
Mecamylamine
Transplants
Wounds and Injuries
Sciatic Nerve
Constriction
Analgesics
In Vitro Techniques
Painful Neuropathy

Keywords

  • Adrenal medulla
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Neural transplants
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Spinal cord
  • Voltammetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Spinal CSF from rats with painful peripheral neuropathy evokes catecholamine release from chromaffin cells in vitro. / Hentall, Ian; Sagen, Jacqueline.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 286, No. 2, 02.06.2000, p. 95-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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