Spinal cord coordination of hindlimb movements in the turtle

Interlimb temporal relationships during bilateral scratching and swimming

Edelle C. Field, Paul S G Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hindlimb interlimb coordination was examined in turtles during symmetrical 'same-form' behaviors in which both hindlimbs utilized the same movement strategy ('form') and during asymmetric 'mixed-form' behaviors in which the form exhibited by one hindlimb differed from that of its contralateral partner. In spinal turtles, three forms of scratching were examined: rostral, pocket, and caudal. Bilateral symmetrical same-form scratching was studied for each of the forms. Asymmetric mixed-form scratching (rostral scratching of a hindlimb and pocket scratching of the other hindlimb) was also examined. In intact turtles, two forms of swimming were examined: forward swimming and back-paddling. The symmetrical behavior of bilateral forward same-form swimming and the asymmetric behavior of turning mixed-form swimming (forward swimming of 1 hindlimb and back-paddling of the other hindlimb) were studied. For all behaviors examined, most episodes displayed absolute or 1:1 coordination; in this type of coordination, during each movement cycle that began and ended with the onset of ipsilateral hip flexion, there was a single onset of contralateral hip flexion. For most of these episodes there was out-of-phase coordination between hip movements; the onset of contralateral hip flexion occurred near the onset of ipsilateral hip extension midway through the ipsilateral movement cycle. Bilateral caudal/caudal same-form scratching displayed out- of-phase 1:1 coordination during some episodes and in-phase 1:1 coordination during other episodes. During in-phase coordination, the onset of contralateral hip flexion occurred near the onset of ipsilateral hip flexion close to the start of the ipsilateral movement cycle. In a few cases of bilateral same-form scratching there were episodes of relative or 2:1 coordination; in this type of coordination, during each movement cycle of the slowly moving limb that began and ended with ipsilateral hip flexion, there were two distinct occurrences of the onset of contralateral hip flexion. The observation that out-of-phase movements of the hip occurred during symmetrical as well as asymmetric behaviors is consistent with the hypothesis that timing signals related to hip movement play a major role in interlimb phase control. The neural mechanisms responsible for interlimb phase control are not well understood in vertebrates. The present demonstration of bilateral scratching in spinal turtles suggests that this preparation may be suitable for additional experiments to examine mechanisms of vertebrate interlimb phase control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1404-1413
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume78
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 1997

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Turtles
Hindlimb
Hip
Spinal Cord
Vertebrates
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Spinal cord coordination of hindlimb movements in the turtle : Interlimb temporal relationships during bilateral scratching and swimming. / Field, Edelle C.; Stein, Paul S G.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.09.1997, p. 1404-1413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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