Spinal cord control of movement: Implications for locomotor rehabilitation following spinal cord injury

Edelle Carmen Field-Fote

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, our understanding of the spinal cord's role in movement control has been greatly advanced. Research suggests that body weight support (BWS) walking and functional electrical stimulation (FES), techniques that are used by physical therapists, have potential to improve walking function in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), perhaps long after the stage of spontaneous recovery. Walking is one of the most desired goals of people with SCI; however, we are obligated to be judicious in our claims of locomotor recovery. There are few controlled studies that compare outcomes of BWS training or FES with those of conventional interventions, and access to services using BWS training or FES may be restricted under managed care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-484
Number of pages8
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume80
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2000

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Electric Stimulation
Walking
Training Support
Spinal Cord
Rehabilitation
Body Weight
Physical Therapists
Managed Care Programs
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Keywords

  • Body weight support
  • Central pattern generator
  • Gait training
  • Locomotion
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Spinal cord control of movement : Implications for locomotor rehabilitation following spinal cord injury. / Field-Fote, Edelle Carmen.

In: Physical Therapy, Vol. 80, No. 5, 01.05.2000, p. 477-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5ca066b7eca94810b3cb760215044864,
title = "Spinal cord control of movement: Implications for locomotor rehabilitation following spinal cord injury",
abstract = "In recent years, our understanding of the spinal cord's role in movement control has been greatly advanced. Research suggests that body weight support (BWS) walking and functional electrical stimulation (FES), techniques that are used by physical therapists, have potential to improve walking function in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), perhaps long after the stage of spontaneous recovery. Walking is one of the most desired goals of people with SCI; however, we are obligated to be judicious in our claims of locomotor recovery. There are few controlled studies that compare outcomes of BWS training or FES with those of conventional interventions, and access to services using BWS training or FES may be restricted under managed care.",
keywords = "Body weight support, Central pattern generator, Gait training, Locomotion, Spinal cord injury",
author = "Field-Fote, {Edelle Carmen}",
year = "2000",
month = "5",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "80",
pages = "477--484",
journal = "Physical Therapy",
issn = "0031-9023",
publisher = "American Physical Therapy Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spinal cord control of movement

T2 - Implications for locomotor rehabilitation following spinal cord injury

AU - Field-Fote, Edelle Carmen

PY - 2000/5/1

Y1 - 2000/5/1

N2 - In recent years, our understanding of the spinal cord's role in movement control has been greatly advanced. Research suggests that body weight support (BWS) walking and functional electrical stimulation (FES), techniques that are used by physical therapists, have potential to improve walking function in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), perhaps long after the stage of spontaneous recovery. Walking is one of the most desired goals of people with SCI; however, we are obligated to be judicious in our claims of locomotor recovery. There are few controlled studies that compare outcomes of BWS training or FES with those of conventional interventions, and access to services using BWS training or FES may be restricted under managed care.

AB - In recent years, our understanding of the spinal cord's role in movement control has been greatly advanced. Research suggests that body weight support (BWS) walking and functional electrical stimulation (FES), techniques that are used by physical therapists, have potential to improve walking function in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), perhaps long after the stage of spontaneous recovery. Walking is one of the most desired goals of people with SCI; however, we are obligated to be judicious in our claims of locomotor recovery. There are few controlled studies that compare outcomes of BWS training or FES with those of conventional interventions, and access to services using BWS training or FES may be restricted under managed care.

KW - Body weight support

KW - Central pattern generator

KW - Gait training

KW - Locomotion

KW - Spinal cord injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034018402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034018402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10792858

AN - SCOPUS:0034018402

VL - 80

SP - 477

EP - 484

JO - Physical Therapy

JF - Physical Therapy

SN - 0031-9023

IS - 5

ER -