Specificity of cognitive biases in patients with current depression and remitted depression and in patients with asthma

A. Fritzsche, B. Dahme, I. H. Gotlib, J. Joormann, H. Magnussen, H. Watz, D. O. Nutzinger, A. Von Leupoldt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Previous studies have demonstrated a specific cognitive bias for sad stimuli in currently depressed patients; little is known, however, about whether this bias persists after recovery from the depressive episode. Depression is frequently observed in patients with asthma and is associated with a worse course of the disease. Given these high rates of co-morbidity, we could expect to observe a similar bias towards sad stimuli in patients with asthma.Method We therefore examined cognitive biases in memory and attention in 20 currently and 20 formerly depressed participants, 20 never-depressed patients diagnosed with asthma, and 20 healthy control participants. All participants completed three cognitive tasks: the self-referential encoding and incidental recall task, the emotion face dot-probe task and the emotional Stroop task.Results Compared with healthy participants, currently and formerly depressed participants, but not patients with asthma, exhibited specific biases for sad stimuli.Conclusions These results suggest that cognitive biases are evident in depression even after recovery from an acute episode but are not found in never-depressed patients with asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-826
Number of pages12
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Asthma
Depression
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Depression
  • Emotion
  • Information processing
  • Remission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Fritzsche, A., Dahme, B., Gotlib, I. H., Joormann, J., Magnussen, H., Watz, H., ... Von Leupoldt, A. (2010). Specificity of cognitive biases in patients with current depression and remitted depression and in patients with asthma. Psychological Medicine, 40(5), 815-826. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291709990948

Specificity of cognitive biases in patients with current depression and remitted depression and in patients with asthma. / Fritzsche, A.; Dahme, B.; Gotlib, I. H.; Joormann, J.; Magnussen, H.; Watz, H.; Nutzinger, D. O.; Von Leupoldt, A.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 815-826.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fritzsche, A, Dahme, B, Gotlib, IH, Joormann, J, Magnussen, H, Watz, H, Nutzinger, DO & Von Leupoldt, A 2010, 'Specificity of cognitive biases in patients with current depression and remitted depression and in patients with asthma', Psychological Medicine, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 815-826. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291709990948
Fritzsche, A. ; Dahme, B. ; Gotlib, I. H. ; Joormann, J. ; Magnussen, H. ; Watz, H. ; Nutzinger, D. O. ; Von Leupoldt, A. / Specificity of cognitive biases in patients with current depression and remitted depression and in patients with asthma. In: Psychological Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 815-826.
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