Sources of particulate matter in the northeastern United States in summer

1. Direct emissions and secondary formation of organic matter in urban plumes

Joost A. de Gouw, C. A. Brock, Elliot L Atlas, T. S. Bates, F. C. Fehsenfeld, P. D. Goldan, J. S. Holloway, W. C. Kuster, B. M. Lerner, B. M. Matthew, A. M. Middlebrook, T. B. Onasch, R. E. Peltier, P. K. Quinn, C. J. Senff, A. Stohl, A. P. Sullivan, M. Trainer, C. Warneke, R. J. Weber & 1 others E. J. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ship and aircraft measurements of aerosol organic matter (OM) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were made in fresh and aged pollution plumes from major urban areas in the northeastern United States in the framework of the 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) study. A large part of the variability in the data was quantitatively described by a simple parameterization from a previous study that uses measured mixing ratios of CO and either the transport age or the photochemical age of the sampled air masses. The results suggest that OM was mostly due to secondary formation from anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors in urban plumes. Approximately 37% of the secondary formation can be accounted for by the removal of aromatic precursors using newly published particulate mass yields for low-NOx conditions, which are significantly higher than previous results. Of the secondary formation, 63% remains unexplained and is possibly due to semivolatile precursors that are not measurable by standard gas chromatographic methods. The observed secondary OM in urban plumes may account for 35% of the total source of OM in the United States and 8.5% of the global OM source. OM is an important factor in climate and air quality issues, but its sources and formation mechanisms remain poorly quantified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberD08301
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans
Volume113
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 2008

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Particulate Matter
Biological materials
particulates
summer
plumes
particulate matter
plume
organic matter
Volatile Organic Compounds
air quality
air masses
airborne survey
volatile organic compounds
formation mechanism
Carbon Monoxide
ships
mixing ratios
Organic carbon
Parameterization
pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Oceanography

Cite this

Sources of particulate matter in the northeastern United States in summer : 1. Direct emissions and secondary formation of organic matter in urban plumes. / de Gouw, Joost A.; Brock, C. A.; Atlas, Elliot L; Bates, T. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Kuster, W. C.; Lerner, B. M.; Matthew, B. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Onasch, T. B.; Peltier, R. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Senff, C. J.; Stohl, A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.; Weber, R. J.; Williams, E. J.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, Vol. 113, No. 8, D08301, 27.04.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

de Gouw, JA, Brock, CA, Atlas, EL, Bates, TS, Fehsenfeld, FC, Goldan, PD, Holloway, JS, Kuster, WC, Lerner, BM, Matthew, BM, Middlebrook, AM, Onasch, TB, Peltier, RE, Quinn, PK, Senff, CJ, Stohl, A, Sullivan, AP, Trainer, M, Warneke, C, Weber, RJ & Williams, EJ 2008, 'Sources of particulate matter in the northeastern United States in summer: 1. Direct emissions and secondary formation of organic matter in urban plumes', Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, vol. 113, no. 8, D08301. https://doi.org/10.1029/2007JD009243
de Gouw, Joost A. ; Brock, C. A. ; Atlas, Elliot L ; Bates, T. S. ; Fehsenfeld, F. C. ; Goldan, P. D. ; Holloway, J. S. ; Kuster, W. C. ; Lerner, B. M. ; Matthew, B. M. ; Middlebrook, A. M. ; Onasch, T. B. ; Peltier, R. E. ; Quinn, P. K. ; Senff, C. J. ; Stohl, A. ; Sullivan, A. P. ; Trainer, M. ; Warneke, C. ; Weber, R. J. ; Williams, E. J. / Sources of particulate matter in the northeastern United States in summer : 1. Direct emissions and secondary formation of organic matter in urban plumes. In: Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans. 2008 ; Vol. 113, No. 8.
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T2 - 1. Direct emissions and secondary formation of organic matter in urban plumes

AU - de Gouw, Joost A.

AU - Brock, C. A.

AU - Atlas, Elliot L

AU - Bates, T. S.

AU - Fehsenfeld, F. C.

AU - Goldan, P. D.

AU - Holloway, J. S.

AU - Kuster, W. C.

AU - Lerner, B. M.

AU - Matthew, B. M.

AU - Middlebrook, A. M.

AU - Onasch, T. B.

AU - Peltier, R. E.

AU - Quinn, P. K.

AU - Senff, C. J.

AU - Stohl, A.

AU - Sullivan, A. P.

AU - Trainer, M.

AU - Warneke, C.

AU - Weber, R. J.

AU - Williams, E. J.

PY - 2008/4/27

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