Sources of organizational commitment: The effects of internal labor markets and worker values

Song Yang, Steven Worden, George Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Data from the 1991 General Social Survey and National Organizations Survey are used to assess how organizational commitment is structured by one "demand side," organizational-based factor, firm internal labor markets, and one "supply side," individual-based factor, the values/preferences of workers. Findings indicate that organizational commitment is best explained by the joint influence of these two factors rather than by their independent effects. Specifically, firms with internal labor markets are conducive to the development of high levels of organizational commitment to the extent that what they offer, namely, opportunities for career-status and long-term employment "fit" what workers desire: job security and possibilities for promotion with their current employer. We offer directions for future research that may shed additional light on the manner in which internal labor markets and the values/preferences of workers may structure organizational commitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-688
Number of pages22
JournalSociological Spectrum
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sources of organizational commitment: The effects of internal labor markets and worker values'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this