Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs

J. B. Spies, H. Hricak, T. M. Slemmer, S. Zeineh, C. E. Alpers, P. Zayat, T. F. Lue, R. K. Kerlan, Beatrice Madrazo, M. A. Sandler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eleven segmental and eight total renal artery occlusions were evaluated by sonography in transplanted kidneys of 19 adult mongrel dogs. The segmental occlusions were serially scanned daily or every other day for up to 35 days. The total occlusions were scanned daily for up to 10 days. Each occlusion was confirmed angiographically, and kidneys were examined pathologically. Acute segmental renal artery occlusion produces a sequence of sonographic changes, beginning with a focal hypoechoic mass at 24 hr, which stays unchanged for 5-7 days. At 7 days, internal echoes appear, and the infarct slowly consolidates to an echogenic, slightly depressed focus at 17 days. Total renal artery occlusion produced no appreciable change in cortical echogenicity and only slight increase in size. Acute segmental renal infarction can be detected early in its course and demonstrates a sequence of changes that may aid in dating the infarct. Total renal infarction may appear normal sonographically, and further studies are needed to confirm that diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-346
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume142
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 22 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Renal Artery
Dogs
Kidney
Infarction
Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Spies, J. B., Hricak, H., Slemmer, T. M., Zeineh, S., Alpers, C. E., Zayat, P., ... Sandler, M. A. (1984). Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs. American Journal of Roentgenology, 142(2), 341-346.

Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs. / Spies, J. B.; Hricak, H.; Slemmer, T. M.; Zeineh, S.; Alpers, C. E.; Zayat, P.; Lue, T. F.; Kerlan, R. K.; Madrazo, Beatrice; Sandler, M. A.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 142, No. 2, 22.03.1984, p. 341-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spies, JB, Hricak, H, Slemmer, TM, Zeineh, S, Alpers, CE, Zayat, P, Lue, TF, Kerlan, RK, Madrazo, B & Sandler, MA 1984, 'Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 142, no. 2, pp. 341-346.
Spies JB, Hricak H, Slemmer TM, Zeineh S, Alpers CE, Zayat P et al. Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs. American Journal of Roentgenology. 1984 Mar 22;142(2):341-346.
Spies, J. B. ; Hricak, H. ; Slemmer, T. M. ; Zeineh, S. ; Alpers, C. E. ; Zayat, P. ; Lue, T. F. ; Kerlan, R. K. ; Madrazo, Beatrice ; Sandler, M. A. / Sonographic evaluation of experimental acute renal arterial occlusion in dogs. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1984 ; Vol. 142, No. 2. pp. 341-346.
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