Sodium valproate in the treatment of intractable seizure disorders

a clinical and electroencephalographic study

D. J. Adams, H. Luders, C. Pippenger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 12-week study of clinical response, EEG changes and serum antiepileptic drug (AED) levels using sodium valproate (VAL) was undertaken. The study showed that VAL is a powerful adjunct in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. It was most effective in patients with generalized seizures, but no seizure type was totally resistant. No serious adverse effects were encountered; nausea was easily overcome by readjusting the drug dosage. In most cases the only EEG change was decrease of epileptiform activity, and this correlated well with decreased frequency of clinical seizures. These two features in turn were most often seen with a serum VAL level of 40μg per milliliter or greater. Intoxication with VAL was accompanied by marked slowing of the background rhythms, but no increase in beta activity. Other modifications of the EEG were probably due to changes in the plasma levels of other drugs. Interactions between VAL and conventional antiepileptic drugs occur, so that serum concentrations of all drugs must be monitored in patients receiving VAL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-157
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume28
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Valproic Acid
Epilepsy
Electroencephalography
Seizures
Anticonvulsants
Therapeutics
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Nausea
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sodium valproate in the treatment of intractable seizure disorders : a clinical and electroencephalographic study. / Adams, D. J.; Luders, H.; Pippenger, C.

In: Neurology, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.01.1978, p. 152-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, D. J. ; Luders, H. ; Pippenger, C. / Sodium valproate in the treatment of intractable seizure disorders : a clinical and electroencephalographic study. In: Neurology. 1978 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 152-157.
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