Sodium uptake in different life stages of crustaceans: The water flea Daphnia magna Strauss

Adalto Bianchini, Chris M. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concentration-dependent kinetics and main mechanisms of whole-body Na+ uptake were assessed in neonate and adult water flea Daphnia magna Strauss acclimated to moderately hard water (0.6 mmol l-1 NaCl, 1.0 mmol l-1 CaCO3 and 0.15 mmol l-1 MgSO 4·7H2O; pH 8.2). Whole-body Na+ uptake is independent of the presence of Cl- in the external medium and kinetic parameters are dependent on the life stage. Adults have a lower maximum capacity of Na+ transport on a mass-specific basis but a higher affinity for Na+ when compared to neonates. Based on pharmacological analyses, mechanisms involved in whole-body Na+ uptake differ according to the life stage considered. In neonates, a proton pump-coupled Na+ channel appears to play an important role in the whole-body Na+ uptake at the apical membrane. However, they do not appear to contribute to whole-body Na+ uptake in adults, where only the Na + channel seems to be present, associated with the Na +/H+ exchanger. In both cases, carbonic anhydrase contributes by providing H+ for the transporters. At the basolateral membrane of the salt-transporting epithelia of neonates, Na+ is pumped from the cells to the extracellular fluid by a Na+,K +-ATPase and a Na+/Cl- exchanger whereas K + and Cl- move through specific channels. In adults, a Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter replaces the Na +/Cl- exchanger. Differential sensitivity of neonates and adults to iono- and osmoregulatory toxicants, such as metals, are discussed with respect to differences in whole-body Na+ uptake kinetics, as well as in the mechanisms of Na+ transport involved in the whole-body Na+ uptake in the two life stages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-547
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume211
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Fingerprint

Cladocera
Daphnia
Daphnia magna
neonate
crustacean
Crustacea
Sodium
sodium
uptake mechanisms
neonates
Member 3 Solute Carrier Family 12
Proton Pumps
Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter
Carbonic Anhydrases
Membranes
kinetics
Extracellular Fluid
membrane
Epithelium
Salts

Keywords

  • Crustacean
  • Daphnia magna
  • Ion transport
  • Life stage
  • Na uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Sodium uptake in different life stages of crustaceans : The water flea Daphnia magna Strauss. / Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 211, No. 4, 01.02.2008, p. 539-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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