Social Support, Relationship Power, and Knowledge of HIV+ Serostatus in Sexual Risk Behavior Among Women in Psychiatric Treatment

John M. Abbamonte, Robert C. McMahon, Evan T. Stanforth, Rhonda Rosenberg, Michèle Jean-Gilles, Jessy G. Dévieux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined social support, perceived relationship power, and knowledge of HIV+ serostatus in relation to frequency of unprotected sex acts and number of partners among women with comorbid psychiatric illness receiving treatment. Data were drawn from an initial assessment of participants enrolled in an HIV risk reduction intervention (N = 284), and two generalized linear models were used to examine the potential associations. Relationship power was significantly associated with fewer unprotected sex acts. This relationship was stronger among those with greater social support. Knowledge of HIV+ serostatus was linked with fewer sexual partners and less unprotected sex. Findings also revealed that the protective nature of support varies by level of perceived relationship power, with higher power indicative of a stronger protective relationship. Study findings suggest that the potential protective benefits of social support may depend on one’s perceived relationship power. Implications for HIV prevention intervention for this at-risk group are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Mental illness
  • Relationship power
  • Sex risk behaviors
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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