Social cognition, social competence, negative symptoms and social outcomes: Inter-relationships in people with schizophrenia

Marc Kalin, Sara Kaplan, Felicia Gould, Amy E. Pinkham, David L. Penn, Philip D Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social deficits are common in people with schizophrenia and the treatment of deficits in social competence has been a long-time treatment strategy. However, negative symptoms and social cognitive deficits also contribute to social dysfunction. In this study, we examined the correlations between everyday social outcomes, a performance based measure of social competence, and performance on 8 different social cognition tests in 179 patients with schizophrenia. Social cognition, social competence, and motivation-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in real-world social outcomes. In addition, two different social cognition tests, along with expression-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in performance-based assessments of social competence. These data suggest that negative symptoms exert an important influence on social outcomes and social competence, but not social cognition, and that social cognition and social competence exert separable influences on real-world social outcomes. Improving social outcomes seems to require a multi-faceted approach which considers social cognition, social competence, and negative symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-260
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cognition
Schizophrenia
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Social Skills
Social Competence
Social Cognition
Interrelationship
Motivation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Negative symptoms
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social cognition
  • Social competence
  • Social functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Social cognition, social competence, negative symptoms and social outcomes : Inter-relationships in people with schizophrenia. / Kalin, Marc; Kaplan, Sara; Gould, Felicia; Pinkham, Amy E.; Penn, David L.; Harvey, Philip D.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 68, 01.09.2015, p. 254-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{90348d7c003f4108bc11bcc4faa15a77,
title = "Social cognition, social competence, negative symptoms and social outcomes: Inter-relationships in people with schizophrenia",
abstract = "Social deficits are common in people with schizophrenia and the treatment of deficits in social competence has been a long-time treatment strategy. However, negative symptoms and social cognitive deficits also contribute to social dysfunction. In this study, we examined the correlations between everyday social outcomes, a performance based measure of social competence, and performance on 8 different social cognition tests in 179 patients with schizophrenia. Social cognition, social competence, and motivation-related negative symptoms accounted for 32{\%} of the variance in real-world social outcomes. In addition, two different social cognition tests, along with expression-related negative symptoms accounted for 32{\%} of the variance in performance-based assessments of social competence. These data suggest that negative symptoms exert an important influence on social outcomes and social competence, but not social cognition, and that social cognition and social competence exert separable influences on real-world social outcomes. Improving social outcomes seems to require a multi-faceted approach which considers social cognition, social competence, and negative symptoms.",
keywords = "Negative symptoms, Schizophrenia, Social cognition, Social competence, Social functioning",
author = "Marc Kalin and Sara Kaplan and Felicia Gould and Pinkham, {Amy E.} and Penn, {David L.} and Harvey, {Philip D}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.07.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "254--260",
journal = "Journal of Psychiatric Research",
issn = "0022-3956",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social cognition, social competence, negative symptoms and social outcomes

T2 - Inter-relationships in people with schizophrenia

AU - Kalin, Marc

AU - Kaplan, Sara

AU - Gould, Felicia

AU - Pinkham, Amy E.

AU - Penn, David L.

AU - Harvey, Philip D

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Social deficits are common in people with schizophrenia and the treatment of deficits in social competence has been a long-time treatment strategy. However, negative symptoms and social cognitive deficits also contribute to social dysfunction. In this study, we examined the correlations between everyday social outcomes, a performance based measure of social competence, and performance on 8 different social cognition tests in 179 patients with schizophrenia. Social cognition, social competence, and motivation-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in real-world social outcomes. In addition, two different social cognition tests, along with expression-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in performance-based assessments of social competence. These data suggest that negative symptoms exert an important influence on social outcomes and social competence, but not social cognition, and that social cognition and social competence exert separable influences on real-world social outcomes. Improving social outcomes seems to require a multi-faceted approach which considers social cognition, social competence, and negative symptoms.

AB - Social deficits are common in people with schizophrenia and the treatment of deficits in social competence has been a long-time treatment strategy. However, negative symptoms and social cognitive deficits also contribute to social dysfunction. In this study, we examined the correlations between everyday social outcomes, a performance based measure of social competence, and performance on 8 different social cognition tests in 179 patients with schizophrenia. Social cognition, social competence, and motivation-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in real-world social outcomes. In addition, two different social cognition tests, along with expression-related negative symptoms accounted for 32% of the variance in performance-based assessments of social competence. These data suggest that negative symptoms exert an important influence on social outcomes and social competence, but not social cognition, and that social cognition and social competence exert separable influences on real-world social outcomes. Improving social outcomes seems to require a multi-faceted approach which considers social cognition, social competence, and negative symptoms.

KW - Negative symptoms

KW - Schizophrenia

KW - Social cognition

KW - Social competence

KW - Social functioning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937938910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937938910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.07.008

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.07.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 26228427

AN - SCOPUS:84937938910

VL - 68

SP - 254

EP - 260

JO - Journal of Psychiatric Research

JF - Journal of Psychiatric Research

SN - 0022-3956

ER -