Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents: Factorial Invariance Across Gender and Age in Hispanic American Adolescents

Annette M La Greca, Candido J. Ingles, Betty S. Lai, Juan C. Marzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social anxiety is a common psychological disorder that often emerges during adolescence and is associated with significant impairment. Efforts to prevent social anxiety disorder require sound assessment measures for identifying anxious youth, especially those from minority backgrounds. We examined the factorial invariance and latent mean differences of the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A) across gender and age groups in Hispanic American adolescents (N = 1,191; 56% girls; 15-18 years) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses. Results indicated that the factorial configuration of the correlated three-factor model of the SAS-A was invariant across gender and age. Analyses of latent mean differences revealed that boys exhibited higher structured means than girls on the Social Avoidance and Distress–General (SAD-General) subscale. On all SAS-A subscales, Fear of Negative Evaluation, Social Avoidance and Distress-New, and SAD-General, estimates of the structured means decreased with adolescent age. Implications for further research and clinical practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-232
Number of pages9
JournalAssessment
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2015

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • factorial invariance
  • gender
  • Hispanic American
  • social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents: Factorial Invariance Across Gender and Age in Hispanic American Adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this