Smoking abstinence-related expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and women

Potential mechanisms of tobacco-related disparities

Peter S. Hendricks, J. Lee Westmaas, Van M. Van, Christopher B. Thorne, Sabrina B. Wood, Majel R. Baker, R. Marsh Lawler, Monica W Hooper, Kevin L. Delucchi, Sharon M. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has documented tobacco-related health disparities by race and gender. Prior research, however, has not examined expectancies about the smoking cessation process (i.e., abstinence-related expectancies) as potential contributors to tobacco-related disparities in special populations. This cross-sectional study compared abstinence-related expectancies between American Indian (n = 87), African American (n = 151), and White (n = 185) smokers, and between women (n = 231) and men (n = 270) smokers. Abstinence-related expectancies also were examined as mediators of race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self efficacy. Results indicated that American Indians and African Americans were less likely than Whites to expect withdrawal effects, and more likely to expect that quitting would be unproblematic. African Americans also were less likely than Whites to expect smoking cessation interventions to be effective. Compared with men, women were more likely to expect withdrawal effects and weight gain. These expectancy differences mediated race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self-efficacy. Findings emphasize potential mechanisms underlying tobacco-related health disparities among American Indians, African Americans, and women and suggest a number of specific approaches for targeting tobacco dependence interventions to these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-205
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

North American Indians
African Americans
Tobacco
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Self Efficacy
Motivation
Tobacco Use Disorder
Health
Research
Population
Weight Gain
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Abstinence
  • African Americans
  • American Indians
  • Disparities
  • Expectancies
  • Gender
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Smoking abstinence-related expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and women : Potential mechanisms of tobacco-related disparities. / Hendricks, Peter S.; Westmaas, J. Lee; Van, Van M.; Thorne, Christopher B.; Wood, Sabrina B.; Baker, Majel R.; Lawler, R. Marsh; Hooper, Monica W; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Hall, Sharon M.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2014, p. 193-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hendricks, PS, Westmaas, JL, Van, VM, Thorne, CB, Wood, SB, Baker, MR, Lawler, RM, Hooper, MW, Delucchi, KL & Hall, SM 2014, 'Smoking abstinence-related expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and women: Potential mechanisms of tobacco-related disparities', Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 193-205. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031938
Hendricks, Peter S. ; Westmaas, J. Lee ; Van, Van M. ; Thorne, Christopher B. ; Wood, Sabrina B. ; Baker, Majel R. ; Lawler, R. Marsh ; Hooper, Monica W ; Delucchi, Kevin L. ; Hall, Sharon M. / Smoking abstinence-related expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and women : Potential mechanisms of tobacco-related disparities. In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 193-205.
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