Small for gestational age and higher birth weight predict childhood obesity in preterm infants

Ronnesia B. Gaskins, Linda L. Lagasse, Jing Liu, Seetha Shankaran, Barry M. Lester, Henrietta S. Bada, Charles R. Bauer, Abhik Das, Rosemary D. Higgins, Mary Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

We sought to determine the association between small for gestational age (SGA), birth weight, and childhood obesity within preterm polysubstance exposed children. We sampled 312 preterm children with 11-year body mass index (BMI; age- and sex-specific) data from the Maternal Lifestyle Study (51% girls, 21.5% SGA, 46% prenatal cocaine, and 55% tobacco exposed). Multinomial regression analyzed the association between 11-year obesity (OBE) and overweight (OW) and SGA, birth weight, first-year growth velocity, diet, and physical activity variables. Overall, 24% were OBE (BMI for age ≥95th percentile) and 16.7% were OW (BMI ≥85th and <95th percentiles). In adjusted analyses, SGA was associated with OW (odds ratio [OR]=3.4, confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 7.5). Higher birth weight was associated with OBE (OR=1.8, CI 1.3 to 2.4) and OW (OR=1.4, CI 1.1 to 2.0). Growth velocity was associated with OBE (OR=2.7, CI 1.8 to 4.0) and OW (OR=1.6, CI 1.1 to 2.4). Low exercise was associated with OBE (OR=2.1, CI 1.0 to 4.4) and OW (OR=2.1, CI 1.0 to 4.5). There was no effect of substance exposure on obesity outcomes. Many (41%) of these high-risk preterm 11-year-olds were obese/overweight. Multiple growth-related processes may be involved in obesity risk for preterm children, including fetal programming as indicated by the SGA effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-730
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume27
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 24 2010

Keywords

  • birth weight
  • Childhood obesity
  • exercise
  • infant SGA
  • premature birth
  • prenatal drug exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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  • Cite this

    Gaskins, R. B., Lagasse, L. L., Liu, J., Shankaran, S., Lester, B. M., Bada, H. S., Bauer, C. R., Das, A., Higgins, R. D., & Roberts, M. (2010). Small for gestational age and higher birth weight predict childhood obesity in preterm infants. American Journal of Perinatology, 27(9), 721-730. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1253555