Six-year outcomes in first admission adolescent inpatients: Clinical and cognitive characteristics at admission as predictors

David L. Pogge, Brie Insalaco, Hilary Bertisch, Lale Bilginer, John Stokes, Barbara A. Cornblatt, Philip D Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persistent functional disability is common after even a single psychiatric admission in people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but less is known about other conditions and about adolescent onset patients. This study examined clinical symptoms and cognitive performance at the time of the first admission for the prediction of 6-year outcomes. First admission adolescent patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with comprehensive clinical ratings of psychopathology, a neuropsychological assessment, and received clinical diagnoses while experiencing their first psychiatric admission. They were contacted 6 years after discharge and examined with a structured assessment of psychiatric symptoms and functioning. Despite the low levels of overall impairment at follow-up, at least 20% of the variance in depression, psychosis, poor peer relationships and poor school attendance 6 years after the hospital admission were predicted by information collected during the hospitalization. Attentional deficits during admission predicted the presence of psychosis at follow-up more substantially than psychotic symptoms during admission, as well as predicting risk for relapse. Attentional deficits during a first psychiatric admission predicted risk for manifesting psychosis at 6-year follow-up to a more substantial degree than either a psychosis diagnosis or psychotic symptoms at admission. In contrast to psychosis, depression at follow-up was predicted by admission symptomatology, but not by cognitive deficits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume160
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychotic Disorders
Inpatients
Psychiatry
Depression
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Symptom Assessment
Patient Admission
Psychopathology
Bipolar Disorder
Mental Disorders
Schizophrenia
Hospitalization
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Functional outcomes
  • Major depression
  • Psychosis
  • Vigilance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Six-year outcomes in first admission adolescent inpatients : Clinical and cognitive characteristics at admission as predictors. / Pogge, David L.; Insalaco, Brie; Bertisch, Hilary; Bilginer, Lale; Stokes, John; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Harvey, Philip D.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 160, No. 1, 15.07.2008, p. 47-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pogge, David L. ; Insalaco, Brie ; Bertisch, Hilary ; Bilginer, Lale ; Stokes, John ; Cornblatt, Barbara A. ; Harvey, Philip D. / Six-year outcomes in first admission adolescent inpatients : Clinical and cognitive characteristics at admission as predictors. In: Psychiatry Research. 2008 ; Vol. 160, No. 1. pp. 47-54.
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