Simultaneous measurement of current and temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

Guangsheng Zhang, Liejin Guo, Lizhong Ma, Hongtan Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a specially designed current distribution measurement gasket in anode and thin thermocouples between the catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer (GDL) in cathode, in-plane current and temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) have been simultaneously measured. Such simultaneous measurements are realized in a commercially available experimental PEMFC. Experiments have been conducted under different air flow rates, different hydrogen flow rates and different operating voltages, and measurement results show that there is a very good correlation between local temperature rise and local current density. Such correlations can be explained and agree well with basic thermodynamic analysis. Measurement results also show that significant difference exists between the temperatures at cathode catalyst layer/GDL interface and that in the center of cathode endplate, which is often taken as the cell operating temperature. Compared with separate measurement of local current density or temperature, simultaneous measurements of both can reveal additional information on reaction irreversibility and various transport phenomena in fuel cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3597-3604
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Power Sources
Volume195
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Current distribution
  • PEM
  • Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)
  • Simultaneous measurement
  • Temperature distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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