Simultaneous identification of causal genes and dys-regulated pathways in complex diseases

Yoo Ah Kim, Stefan Wuchty, Teresa M. Przytycka

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In complex diseases different genotypic perturbations of the cellular system often lead to the same phenotype. While characteristic genomic alterations in many cancers exist, other combinations of genomic perturbations potentially lead to the same disease, dysregulating important pathways of the cellular system. In this study, we developed novel computational methods to identify dysregulated pathways and their direct causes in individual patients or patient groups. Specifically, we introduced efficient and powerful graph theoretic algorithms to identify such dysregulated pathways and their causal genes and applied our methods to a large set of glioma specific molecular data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearch in Computational Molecular Biology - 14th Annual International Conference, RECOMB 2010, Proceedings
Pages263-280
Number of pages18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 23 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event14th Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, RECOMB 2010 - Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: Apr 25 2010Apr 28 2010

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6044 LNBI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other14th Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, RECOMB 2010
CountryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period4/25/104/28/10

Keywords

  • Biological pathway
  • Complex disease
  • Copy number variation
  • Genetic variations
  • Glioma
  • Graph theoretic algorithm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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