Signing cards, saving lives

An evaluation of the worksite organ donation promotion project

Susan Morgan, Jenny Miller, Lily A. Arasaratnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The desperate need for organ donors in the United States could be filled if every person eligible became an organ donor. Unfortunately, few organ donation campaigns exist, and fewer still have been evaluated empirically. This study has two objectives: to describe a worksite organ donation campaign and test campaign effects, and to test the Model of Behavioral Willingness to Donate Organs. Results of the campaign evaluation demonstrate that the worksite campaign was successful in increasing knowledge, favorable attitudes toward organ donation, behavioral intent to sign an organ donor card, actual rates of signed organ donor cards, and the willingness to talk to family members about the decision to donate organs. Results of path analyses produced mixed results with regard to model testing. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-273
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

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organ donation
promotion
campaign
evaluation
Testing
family member
Signing
Evaluation
Organ Donation
Organs
human being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

Signing cards, saving lives : An evaluation of the worksite organ donation promotion project. / Morgan, Susan; Miller, Jenny; Arasaratnam, Lily A.

In: Communication Monographs, Vol. 69, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 253-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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