Sickled cells in synovial fluid

Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy

S. L. Glickstein, J. W. Melton, P. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this report, we have described three patients who had hemarthroses, with sickled red blood cells discovered by analysis of synovial fluid. On the basis of this observation, each patient was evaluated for the presence of abnormal hemoglobins, and each was found to have a hemoglobinopathy that was previously unsuspected. These patients differ from those in other reports in that two of the three had no associated arthritic condition that could readily explain synovitis or a condition that predisposed them to bleeding into a joint. Although the accumulated evidence suggests that heterozygous hemoglobinopathies do not produce arthritic syndromes, these reports again raise that question. We cannot conclude, however, that the hemarthroses were definitively caused by the underlying hematologic abnormality. What can be reemphasized is the need for careful synovial fluid examination on all patients whose joints are aspirated. This is especially important when synovial fluid is mixed with blood, since other medical conditions can be diagnosed if abnormal findings are detected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-771
Number of pages3
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume82
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Hemoglobinopathies
Synovial Fluid
Hemarthrosis
Arthritis
Joints
Abnormal Hemoglobins
Synovitis
Erythrocytes
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Glickstein, S. L., Melton, J. W., & Katz, P. (1989). Sickled cells in synovial fluid: Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy. Southern Medical Journal, 82(6), 769-771.

Sickled cells in synovial fluid : Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy. / Glickstein, S. L.; Melton, J. W.; Katz, P.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 82, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 769-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glickstein, SL, Melton, JW & Katz, P 1989, 'Sickled cells in synovial fluid: Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 769-771.
Glickstein SL, Melton JW, Katz P. Sickled cells in synovial fluid: Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy. Southern Medical Journal. 1989 Jan 1;82(6):769-771.
Glickstein, S. L. ; Melton, J. W. ; Katz, P. / Sickled cells in synovial fluid : Clue to unsuspected hemoglobinopathy. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1989 ; Vol. 82, No. 6. pp. 769-771.
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