Sickle cell disease related mortality in the United States (1999-2009)

Dima Hamideh, Ofelia A Alvarez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the national outcome of children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) given contemporary care. Procedure: We investigated the number of deaths, standardized crude and age-adjusted mortality rates, and causes of death among individuals with SCD across the United States during 1999-2009 according to death certificates by using a publicly available website (http://wonder.cdc.gov/). Data were compared to mortality during 1979-1998. Results: When compared to 1979-1998, mortality significantly decreased by 61% in infants <1 year of age, by 67% in children aged 1-4 years, and by 22-35% in children aged 5-19 years. After 19 years of age, mortality rates increased from 0.6 in the 15-19 year group to 1.4/100,000 in the 20-24 year group, corresponding to the transition period from pediatric to adult medical care, and this increase was similar during 1979-1998. Although the age groups with the highest mortality were 35-44 years for males and 45-54 years for females, there was a tendency for longer survival because there were more deaths among those individuals 55-74 years of age compared to previous years. For all individuals, the causes of deaths were cardiac disease (31.6%), respiratory (28.1%), renal (16.4%), infectious (14.4%), neurologic (11.9%), and gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary (9.2%) in nature. Cancer was the cause of death in <1%. Conclusion: Mortality during childhood has decreased significantly. However, the transition period from pediatric to adult care is critical. Risk-reduction, monitoring, and early treatment intervention of cardiovascular disease in adults is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1482-1486
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume60
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Anemia
Mortality
Cause of Death
Transition to Adult Care
Death Certificates
Risk Reduction Behavior
Nervous System
Heart Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Age Groups
Pediatrics
Kidney
Survival
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Mortality
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Survival
  • Transition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

Cite this

Sickle cell disease related mortality in the United States (1999-2009). / Hamideh, Dima; Alvarez, Ofelia A.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 60, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 1482-1486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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