Should neurologists be trained to recognize and treat comorbid depression of neurologic disorders? Yes

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression is a relatively common psychiatric comorbididy of most neurological disorders, with prevalence rates ranging between 20 and 50% among patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and dementia. Furthermore, depression is an independent predictor of poor quality of life in these patients and has a negative impact on the response to treatment, course and recovery of neurological deficits. Thus, treatment of depression has become an integral part of the managment of these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the rationale for neurologists to be trained in recognizing depressive disorders in neurologic patients and identifies the type of mood disorders in which neurologists can provide pharmacotherapy and those that need to be referred to the care of the psychiatrist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-311
Number of pages9
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's dementia
  • Depression
  • Dysthymia
  • Hippocampal atrophy
  • Minor depression
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Stroke
  • Subsyndromal depression
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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