Short sleep is associated with more depressive symptoms in a multi-ethnic cohort of older adults

Suzanne Lippman, Hannah Gardener, Tatjana Rundek, Azizi Seixas, Mitchell S.V. Elkind, Ralph L Sacco, Clinton B Wright, Alberto Ramos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives To evaluate cross-sectional and prospective associations between short and long sleep duration and depressive symptoms in older adults (aged >65 years). Methods The data from a subsample of the racially/ethnically diverse Northern Manhattan Study were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), approximately 5 years apart. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a CES-D score ≥16 or use of antidepressants. Self-reports of short (<6 h), intermediate (6–8 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep were assessed prior to the initial CES-D. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between short and long sleep durations with depressive symptoms, using intermediate sleep as the reference. The prospective association between sleep duration and depression in a sample of participants without depressive symptoms at first CES-D was also analyzed. All models were adjusted for demographic, behavioral, and vascular risk factors. Results The initial sample consisted of 1110 participants: 62% women, 69% Hispanic, 17% black, 14% white. Short sleep was reported by 25%, intermediate sleep by 65%, and long sleep by 9%. Depressive symptoms were described in 25% of the initial sample. Short sleep, but not long sleep, was associated with depressive symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.6), and at follow-up (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.5; median follow-up = 5.1 years). Conclusion Short sleep duration had a cross-sectional and prospective association with depressive symptoms in an urban multi-ethnic cohort of older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-62
Number of pages5
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Sleep
Depression
Epidemiologic Studies
Hispanic Americans
Self Report
Antidepressive Agents
Logistic Models
Demography

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Ethnic
  • Race
  • Short sleep
  • Sleep
  • Sleep duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Short sleep is associated with more depressive symptoms in a multi-ethnic cohort of older adults. / Lippman, Suzanne; Gardener, Hannah; Rundek, Tatjana; Seixas, Azizi; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B; Ramos, Alberto.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 40, 01.12.2017, p. 58-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lippman, Suzanne ; Gardener, Hannah ; Rundek, Tatjana ; Seixas, Azizi ; Elkind, Mitchell S.V. ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Wright, Clinton B ; Ramos, Alberto. / Short sleep is associated with more depressive symptoms in a multi-ethnic cohort of older adults. In: Sleep Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 40. pp. 58-62.
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abstract = "Objectives To evaluate cross-sectional and prospective associations between short and long sleep duration and depressive symptoms in older adults (aged >65 years). Methods The data from a subsample of the racially/ethnically diverse Northern Manhattan Study were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), approximately 5 years apart. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a CES-D score ≥16 or use of antidepressants. Self-reports of short (<6 h), intermediate (6–8 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep were assessed prior to the initial CES-D. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between short and long sleep durations with depressive symptoms, using intermediate sleep as the reference. The prospective association between sleep duration and depression in a sample of participants without depressive symptoms at first CES-D was also analyzed. All models were adjusted for demographic, behavioral, and vascular risk factors. Results The initial sample consisted of 1110 participants: 62{\%} women, 69{\%} Hispanic, 17{\%} black, 14{\%} white. Short sleep was reported by 25{\%}, intermediate sleep by 65{\%}, and long sleep by 9{\%}. Depressive symptoms were described in 25{\%} of the initial sample. Short sleep, but not long sleep, was associated with depressive symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR 1.8, 95{\%} CI 1.3–2.6), and at follow-up (adjusted OR 1.9, 95{\%} CI 1.1–3.5; median follow-up = 5.1 years). Conclusion Short sleep duration had a cross-sectional and prospective association with depressive symptoms in an urban multi-ethnic cohort of older adults.",
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AU - Sacco, Ralph L

AU - Wright, Clinton B

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N2 - Objectives To evaluate cross-sectional and prospective associations between short and long sleep duration and depressive symptoms in older adults (aged >65 years). Methods The data from a subsample of the racially/ethnically diverse Northern Manhattan Study were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), approximately 5 years apart. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a CES-D score ≥16 or use of antidepressants. Self-reports of short (<6 h), intermediate (6–8 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep were assessed prior to the initial CES-D. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between short and long sleep durations with depressive symptoms, using intermediate sleep as the reference. The prospective association between sleep duration and depression in a sample of participants without depressive symptoms at first CES-D was also analyzed. All models were adjusted for demographic, behavioral, and vascular risk factors. Results The initial sample consisted of 1110 participants: 62% women, 69% Hispanic, 17% black, 14% white. Short sleep was reported by 25%, intermediate sleep by 65%, and long sleep by 9%. Depressive symptoms were described in 25% of the initial sample. Short sleep, but not long sleep, was associated with depressive symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.6), and at follow-up (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.5; median follow-up = 5.1 years). Conclusion Short sleep duration had a cross-sectional and prospective association with depressive symptoms in an urban multi-ethnic cohort of older adults.

AB - Objectives To evaluate cross-sectional and prospective associations between short and long sleep duration and depressive symptoms in older adults (aged >65 years). Methods The data from a subsample of the racially/ethnically diverse Northern Manhattan Study were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), approximately 5 years apart. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a CES-D score ≥16 or use of antidepressants. Self-reports of short (<6 h), intermediate (6–8 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep were assessed prior to the initial CES-D. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between short and long sleep durations with depressive symptoms, using intermediate sleep as the reference. The prospective association between sleep duration and depression in a sample of participants without depressive symptoms at first CES-D was also analyzed. All models were adjusted for demographic, behavioral, and vascular risk factors. Results The initial sample consisted of 1110 participants: 62% women, 69% Hispanic, 17% black, 14% white. Short sleep was reported by 25%, intermediate sleep by 65%, and long sleep by 9%. Depressive symptoms were described in 25% of the initial sample. Short sleep, but not long sleep, was associated with depressive symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.6), and at follow-up (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.5; median follow-up = 5.1 years). Conclusion Short sleep duration had a cross-sectional and prospective association with depressive symptoms in an urban multi-ethnic cohort of older adults.

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