Shared atypical default mode and salience network functional connectivity between autism and schizophrenia

Heng Chen, Lucina Q Uddin, Xujun Duan, Junjie Zheng, Zhiliang Long, Youxue Zhang, Xiaonan Guo, Yan Zhang, Jingping Zhao, Huafu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are two prevalent neurodevelopmental disorders sharing some similar genetic basis and clinical features. The extent to which they share common neural substrates remains unclear. Resting-state fMRI data were collected from 35 drug-naïve adolescent participants with first-episode schizophrenia (15.6±1.8 years old) and 31 healthy controls (15.4±1.6 years old). Data from 22 participants with ASD (13.1±3.1 years old) and 21 healthy controls (12.9±2.9 years old) were downloaded from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange. Resting-state functional networks were constructed using predefined regions of interest. Multivariate pattern analysis combined with multi-task regression feature selection methods were conducted in two datasets separately. Classification between individuals with disorders and controls was achieved with high accuracy (schizophrenia dataset: accuracy=83%; ASD dataset: accuracy=80%). Shared atypical brain connections contributing to classification were mostly present in the default mode network (DMN) and salience network (SN). These functional connections were further related to severity of social deficits in ASD (p=0.002). Distinct atypical connections were also more related to the DMN and SN, but showed different atypical connectivity patterns between the two disorders. These results suggest some common neural mechanisms contributing to schizophrenia and ASD, and may aid in understanding the pathology of these two neurodevelopmental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAutism Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Schizophrenia
Neuroimaging
Multivariate Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Pathology
Brain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Datasets
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Default mode network
  • Functional connectivity
  • Multivariate pattern analysis
  • Salience network
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Shared atypical default mode and salience network functional connectivity between autism and schizophrenia. / Chen, Heng; Uddin, Lucina Q; Duan, Xujun; Zheng, Junjie; Long, Zhiliang; Zhang, Youxue; Guo, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Jingping; Chen, Huafu.

In: Autism Research, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Heng ; Uddin, Lucina Q ; Duan, Xujun ; Zheng, Junjie ; Long, Zhiliang ; Zhang, Youxue ; Guo, Xiaonan ; Zhang, Yan ; Zhao, Jingping ; Chen, Huafu. / Shared atypical default mode and salience network functional connectivity between autism and schizophrenia. In: Autism Research. 2017.
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