Sex and racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease risk factor treatment and control among individuals with diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

Ginger J. Winston, R. Graham Barr, Olveen Carrasquillo, Alain G. Bertoni, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine sex and racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk factor treatment and control among individuals with diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This study was an observational study examining mean levels of cardiovascular risk factors and proportion of subjects achieving treatment goals. RESULTS - The sample included 926 individuals with diabetes. Compared with men, women were 9% less likely to achieve LDL cholesterol <130 mg/dl (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.91 [0.83-0.99]) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) <130 mmHg (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.91 [0.85-0.98]). These differences diminished over time. A lower percentage of women used aspirin (23 vs. 33%; P < 0.001). African American and Hispanic women had higher mean levels of SBP and lower prevalence of aspirin use than non-Hispanic white women. CONCLUSIONS - Women with diabetes had unfavorable cardiovascular risk factor profiles compared with men. African American and Hispanic women had less favorable profiles than non-Hispanic white women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1467-1469
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Blood Pressure
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Therapeutics
Aspirin
LDL Cholesterol
Observational Studies
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Sex and racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease risk factor treatment and control among individuals with diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). / Winston, Ginger J.; Barr, R. Graham; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Bertoni, Alain G.; Shea, Steven.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 1467-1469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bertoni, Alain G.

AU - Shea, Steven

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