Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder: Summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority

Alycia K. Halladay, Somer Bishop, John N. Constantino, Amy M. Daniels, Katheen Koenig, Kate Palmer, Daniel S Messinger, Kevin Pelphrey, Stephan J. Sanders, Alison Tepper Singer, Julie Lounds Taylor, Peter Szatmari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research is a higher rate of ASD diagnosis in males than females. Despite this, remarkably little research has focused on the reasons for this disparity. Better understanding of this sex difference could lead to major advancements in the prevention or treatment of ASD in both males and females. In October of 2014, Autism Speaks and the Autism Science Foundation co-organized a meeting that brought together almost 60 clinicians, researchers, parents, and self-identified autistic individuals. Discussion at the meeting is summarized here with recommendations on directions of future research endeavors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number36
JournalMolecular Autism
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2015

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Sex Characteristics
Autistic Disorder
Research
Research Personnel
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Diagnosis
  • Female
  • Protection
  • Research
  • Symposium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Halladay, A. K., Bishop, S., Constantino, J. N., Daniels, A. M., Koenig, K., Palmer, K., ... Szatmari, P. (2015). Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder: Summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority. Molecular Autism, 6(1), [36]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13229-015-0019-y

Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder : Summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority. / Halladay, Alycia K.; Bishop, Somer; Constantino, John N.; Daniels, Amy M.; Koenig, Katheen; Palmer, Kate; Messinger, Daniel S; Pelphrey, Kevin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Singer, Alison Tepper; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Szatmari, Peter.

In: Molecular Autism, Vol. 6, No. 1, 36, 13.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halladay, AK, Bishop, S, Constantino, JN, Daniels, AM, Koenig, K, Palmer, K, Messinger, DS, Pelphrey, K, Sanders, SJ, Singer, AT, Taylor, JL & Szatmari, P 2015, 'Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder: Summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority', Molecular Autism, vol. 6, no. 1, 36. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13229-015-0019-y
Halladay, Alycia K. ; Bishop, Somer ; Constantino, John N. ; Daniels, Amy M. ; Koenig, Katheen ; Palmer, Kate ; Messinger, Daniel S ; Pelphrey, Kevin ; Sanders, Stephan J. ; Singer, Alison Tepper ; Taylor, Julie Lounds ; Szatmari, Peter. / Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder : Summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority. In: Molecular Autism. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 1.
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