Service and public systems: opportunities for systems engineering

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In considering the impact of technology on society and productivity, most of the attention has been focused on production and manufacturing, However, in most technologically-avanced countries, the service sector is larger than its manufacturing base, for example, more than 70 percent of all employment in the United States is in services. Yet, the service sector is one of the least researched and lowest in productivity areas of the economy. Financial, health, transportation and food services are all a part of the services sector, as is public services (including police, fire, sanitation, education, etc.). A large number of issues deserve to be addressed, including: How do organizations develop and deliver new services and why? Can the same approaches he applied to services as to products? How can service quality be measured and improved? What role can technology in particular, information systems play in enhancing service productivity? There are many opportunities to apply systems engineering approaches to issues arising in the services area.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
Editors Anon
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Volume5
ISBN (Print)0780309111
StatePublished - Dec 1 1993
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of 1993 International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics - Le Touquet, Fr
Duration: Oct 17 1993Oct 20 1993

Other

OtherProceedings of 1993 International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
CityLe Touquet, Fr
Period10/17/9310/20/93

Fingerprint

Systems engineering
Productivity
Sanitation
Law enforcement
Fires
Information systems
Education
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Tien, J. M. (1993). Service and public systems: opportunities for systems engineering. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (Vol. 5). Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE.

Service and public systems : opportunities for systems engineering. / Tien, James M.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. ed. / Anon. Vol. 5 Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1993.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tien, JM 1993, Service and public systems: opportunities for systems engineering. in Anon (ed.), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. vol. 5, Publ by IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, Proceedings of 1993 International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Le Touquet, Fr, 10/17/93.
Tien JM. Service and public systems: opportunities for systems engineering. In Anon, editor, Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. Vol. 5. Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE. 1993
Tien, James M. / Service and public systems : opportunities for systems engineering. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. editor / Anon. Vol. 5 Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1993.
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