Serum and semen prostate specific antigen concentrations are different in young spinal cord injured men compared to normal controls

Charles M. Lynne, Teodoro C. Aballa, Tang J. Wang, Harry G. Rittenhouse, Sean M. Ferrell, Nancy L. Brackett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Recent investigations have indicated that factors within the seminal plasma may contribute to the condition of low sperm motility in men with spinal cord injury. To determine whether the prostate gland functions normally in these men we chose prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a marker of prostatic function, and compared serum and semen concentrations in spinal cord injured and healthy noninjured men. Materials and Methods: The study included 21 spinal cord injured men (mean age 33.3 ± 1.2 years) and 22 noninjured normal men (mean age 30.3 ± 1.5 years). Blood was obtained from subjects following at least 24 hours of abstinence from ejaculation and serum PSA was determined by modified enzyme immunoassay. Antegrade ejaculates from all subjects were frozen to -80C, exactly 15 minutes after collection. Seminal plasma PSA was determined using Hybritech Tandem(dagger) MP assay. Results: Mean serum PSA concentration was 1.20 ± 0.19 ng./ml. in spinal cord injured and 0.69 ± 0.07 ng./ml. in noninjured men (p <0.02). Mean seminal plasma PSA concentration was 0.59 ± 0.11 mg./ml. in spinal cord injured and 1.29 ± 0.15 mg./ml. in noninjured men (p <0.001). Conclusions: Our findings of elevated serum and decreased seminal plasma PSA concentrations indicate that prostatic secretory dysfunction is present in men with spinal cord injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-91
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume162
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1999

Keywords

  • Fertility
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Semen
  • Spermatozoa
  • Spinal cord injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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