Serratia marcescens bacteremias in an intensive care unit. Contaminated heparinized saline solution as a reservoir

Timothy Cleary, D. S. MacIntyre, M. Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

During a 12-day period, nine patients developed bacteremia with gentamicin-resistant Serratia marcescens in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). These bacteremias differed from previous Serratia infections in the SICU in that they occurred in patients without earlier colonization of the organism at other sites. All cases occurred in one area of the SICU. The clinical syndrome suggested direct intravenous (IV) inoculation. Environmental cultures revealed gentamicin-resistant Serratia in pooled handwashings, on the surface of a patient IV bag, and in a bag of heparinized saline solution used for opening blocked IV tubes. All environmental and eight of nine patient isolates were serotype 0 indeterminate: Hl. The organisms were capable of growth in the heparinized saline solution (10/U ml). Within 6 days, colony counts exceeded 106 organisms/ml. Organisms did not grow in a concentrated heparin solution (500 U/ml); however, they were able to survive for a minimum of 3 days. Heparinized saline solution may have acted as a vehicle in this outbreak.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-111
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume9
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1981

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Serratia marcescens
Bacteremia
Sodium Chloride
Intensive Care Units
Critical Care
Gentamicins
Serratia Infections
Serratia
Hand Disinfection
Disease Outbreaks
Heparin
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Serratia marcescens bacteremias in an intensive care unit. Contaminated heparinized saline solution as a reservoir. / Cleary, Timothy; MacIntyre, D. S.; Castro, M.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.12.1981, p. 107-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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